Pleven Plan


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Pleven Plan

 

a plan for organizing a military bloc of Western European states, proposed in October 1950 by French premier R. Pleven. It formed the basis for the Treaty of Paris of 1952, which provided for the creation of the European Defense Community.

References in periodicals archive ?
The European response to the earlier burden sharing crisis, EDC, was embodied in the Pleven plan, named after the premier of France.
After the release of the Pleven plan, subsequent negotiations made it clear that the EDC would not be the vehicle for the rise of a genuine third great world power, as many leaders of France at the time desired.
At first, many in the Truman administration, including Joint Chiefs Chairman Omar Bradley, felt the Pleven plan rendered NATO totally inoperable, as it precluded U.
The French National Assembly voted down the Pleven plan in August 1954 by a vote of 319-264.
Both the Schuman Plan and the finalized European Army proposal, known as the Pleven Plan, had supranational elements that would force Churchill to choose publicly between a supranationally unified Europe without Britain or an intergovernmentally integrated Europe with Britain but without effective economic and military unity.
The Pleven Plan also called for supranational institutions akin to the Schuman Plan, including a European defense minister responsible to a Council of Ministers.
Although he himself did not favor supranationalism, in a February no-confidence motion debate in the Commons, Churchill seized the chance to criticize Labour for disparaging the Pleven Plan.
Calling the Pleven Plan a "sludgy Amalgam" he argued it lacked esprit de corps and would soon become an "inefficient and ineffective force.
The same can be said of Churchill's speeches on Britain's participation in such federal schemes as the Pleven Plan for a European Army and the Schuman Plan.