Pliopithecus


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Pliopithecus

 

a genus of fossil anthropoid apes. The remains of the lower and upper jaws have been found in Miocene and Pliocene deposits in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Pliopithecus is considered to be the ancestor of extant gibbons but differs from them in a number of primitive characteristics. It is apparently descended from Propliopithecus. The first find of the most widely known species of ancient Pliopithecus was made in 1837 in Miocene deposits in France. The remains of two more species were subsequently found in Egypt and Mongolia.

References in periodicals archive ?
This tooth displays a very peculiar occlusal morphology, which enables it to be distinguished from all other pliopithecids for which this dental posi tion is known (including Barberapithecus, see below, but not Pliopithecus canmatensis).
The pliopithecine morphology and the small size of the dental remains from these several localities from Abocador de Can Mata is most similar to that of Pliopithecus antiquus from the French localities of Sansan (MN6) and La Grive (MN7+8), but dental proportions as well as several occlusal details (less peripheral position of the protoconid and more median position of the hypoconulid, more mesial position of the buccal cuspids compared to the lingual ones, narrower but distinct mesial fovea, higher trigonid, and more extensive buccal cingulid) justify a taxonomic distinction at the species level for the ACM material (Alba et al, 2010d).
Both in size and morphology, this tooth is consistent with an attribution to Pliopithecus platyodon, otherwise unknown from the Iberian Peninsula.
They were partly described and initially attributed to Pliopithecus sp.
This material was initially published by Golpe-Posse (1982b), who attributed it to Pliopithecus sp.
Begun (2002a) suggested that it might correspond to a larger individual of the same taxon represented at Castell de Barbera (currently, Barberapithecus huerzeleri), but given the presence of other pliopithecids (Pliopithecus canmatensis) during the late Aragonian in the same basin, most recently Alba and Moya-Sola (2012a) refrained from providing a formal taxonomic attribution.
In the Iberian Peninsula, pliopithecoids are exclusively known from the Valles-Penedes Basin (NE Spain), where they are recorded by both pliopithecines (the genus Pliopithecus) and crouzeliines (the genera Barberapithecus and Egarapithecus).
(2010d): A new species of Pliopithecus Gervais, 1849 (Primates: Pliopithecidae) from the Middle Miocene (MN8) of Abocador de Can Mata (els Hostalets de Pierola, Catalonia, Spain).
Named Pliopithecus canmatensis, after the site (Can Mata in the Valles-Penedes basin), the primate belonged to an extinct family of Old World monkeys, Catarrhini, which dispersed from Africa to Eurasia.
(1975) New ramapithecines and Pliopithecus from the lower Pliocene of Rudabanya in north-eastern Hungary.