Plosives


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Plosives

 

(occlusive-plosives, explosives), consonants whose pronunciation is accompanied by the explosion of a stop (occlusion).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The voice onset time (VOT) is defined as the time interval between the clearance of the oral obstruction of plosive sound, identified by the burst, and the beginning of the vibration of the vocal cords identified on a broadband spectrogram through the vertical spline [13-15].
a) plosive bilabial sound /b/ is changed to nasal bilabial /m/
The results obtained by Golubovic and Colic [11] show that all tested children from 5.5 and 7 years of age have the proper pronunciation of all sounds, plosives and nasals, which is, according to the authors, expected given that these sounds are the first to be adopted in the speech sound system of Serbian language.
(50) The insertion also stands out from the portion taken from Bede because Bede nowhere states what kind of consonant may be followed by a liquid, whereas Priscian and, in this single case, Hrabanus specify plosives (mutae).
Ejectives are most typically associated with the voiceless plosives /k/ and /t/, but other types (including fricatives) exist as well.
Stimuli for the first experiment were designed as perception test of Hindi velar and uvular plosive pair (/k'/-/q'/J replicated from Best et al.
The fricative contexts were excluded from these analyses because their place of articulation is not comparable to those of the plosive contexts.
Voice onset time is the most commonly studied acoustic correlate of plosives. Therefore the current study focuses on voice onset time.
The structure of IijI word medially in the bi-syllabic words with short and long vowels is similar that is the sound following always carries velar plosive /g/ or /k/.
(lines 21-24) These heavily basilectal lines, with their orthographic elisions and plosive and fricative alliteration, remind readers that dialect verse also requires "wuk"; when Quashie insists that "we dig de row dem eben in a line: McKay is alerting readers to his poetic labor, the labor entailed in putting dialect phrases into fixed verse forms, made of even poetic lines.
Such variation is particularly noticeable in intervocalic [d]~[r] and [g]~[y] alternations: [tchedil]~[tcheril] 'to vomit' and [ugur]~[uyur] 'heavy', respectively, and in voicing alternations for plosives: [tcuput]~[tcubut] 'full'; [krutil]~[krudil] 'to cut'; [lukut]~[lugut] 'small'.
half hinged, hawking dirt on the plosives. The worms