Plutus

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Plutus

 

the god of wealth in Greek mythology. Plutus was sometimes depicted as a blind old man bestowing wealth on people regardless of their moral qualities (as in Aristophanes’ comedy Plutus, 388 B.C.). He was also depicted as a boy holding a horn of plenty and being held in the arms of the goddess of peace, Eirene(as in astatuebyCephisodotus, fourth century B.C.)

Plutus

blind god of Wealth. [Gk. Lit.: Plutus]

Plutus

god of wealth: blind (indiscriminate); lame (slow to accumulate); and winged (quick to disappear). [Gk. Lit.: Plutus]
See: Wealth
References in periodicals archive ?
16) Aristophane, Ploutos, 594-7 :"Hecate, elle sait que ceux qui possedent et sont riches lui apportent un repas chaque mois ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), mais que les pauvres gens le ravissent avant qu'il soit depose".
In addition to this, Fortuna's connection with Ploutos and the inconsistency with her allegiances make her even more of an ideal choice for Grendon as she ties in perfectly with his ideas of destructive wealth and greed, and her abilities to switch allegiances make her his perfect mouthpiece for first supporting and then abandoning Paul Kruger.
The case of Aristophanes is special--deserving a longer analysis which cannot be done here--, first and foremost because he dedicated two comedies, precisely called Eirene (421 BC) and Ploutos (388 BC), to the pair peace/wealth on which we have been focusing.
As goddess of peace, the artists represented Eirene in the company of her son Ploutos (Wealth), in a traditional literary and iconographic association familiar to the writers we have already considered.
Our iconographic data suggest that the official cult to Eirene and Ploutos as a whole became relevant only in the 4th century BC.
From the Greek ploutokratia, from ploutos, wealth, and kratia, advocate of a form of government.
Aside from the Tyrannicides, we shall cite the Persephone of the Corinth-Mocenigo type, the Mattei, Sciarra and Sosikles Amazons, the Velletri Athena, the Aphrodite of the "Hera Borghese" type, the "Westmacott Ephebe," the "Narcissus" of the Louvre, the Ploutos from the Eirene and Ploutos group by Kephisodotos, the Belvedere Apollo.