Pterophoridae

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Pterophoridae

[‚ter·ə′fȯr·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The plume moths, a family of the lepidopteran superfamily Pyralidoidea in which the wings are divided into featherlike plumes, maxillary palpi are lacking, and the legs are long.

Pterophoridae

 

(also Alucitidae), a family of crepuscular insects (moths). The gray or brown narrow wings lie at a right angle to the body when at rest. The forewings are usually two-lobed, and the hind wings three-lobed. The legs are long. The hairy caterpillars live within leaf shoots (chiefly of Compositae), on which they feed. The pupae generally have no cocoon but hang suspended from the plant by their tail. Only a few species spin cocoons. There are about 1,200 species, distributed throughout the world. They are found primarily in tropical regions. Of the approximately 140 species encountered in the USSR, some cause damage to decorative and agricultural plants. The species Platyptilia rhododactyla damages rosebuds.

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References in periodicals archive ?
New species and records of plume moths of the genus Agdistis Hubner, 1825 (Lepidoptera: Pterophoridae, Agdistinae) from southern Africa.
On the fauna of the plume moths (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae Hubner) of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
For example, plume moth larvae damage the growing tips of horehound plants by feeding on the leaves.
The plume moth and the horehound clearwing moth have passed every test with flying colours and were released in 1994 and 1997 respectively.