Plural Voting


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Plural Voting

 

in public law, the right granted to a single voter to cast more than one vote. The practice was widespread in the 19th century, especially in Great Britain, Germany, and a number of other Western European countries, where a citizen might be entered on several voting lists—in the district of residence, as well as in the district where he owned immovable property (for example, a factory) or at the university from which he had received a diploma. Plural voting, which was generally a privilege of the wealthy, declined in importance in the 20th century. However, it is still practiced in some of the Australian states and in New Zealand, where the owners of large properties are allowed several votes each in local elections.

References in periodicals archive ?
The voting system, known as plural voting, allowed a man to vote in any electorate in which he held property.
The Powers Bill was encumbered by including the abolition of plural voting, and the Glassey Bill by including all itinerant workers.
Plural voting was very dear to the non-Labor side of politics as it was one of the bases of its power, and the proposals in the Glassey Bill for enfranchising itinerants were clearly unworkable.
The Premier, James Dickson, an opponent of women's suffrage, promised to abolish plural voting if the referendum was passed, but was silent with respect to the women's vote.