fast breeder reactor

(redirected from Plutonium economy)

fast breeder reactor

[′fast ′brēd·ər rē‚ak·tər]
(nucleonics)
A type of fast reactor using highly enriched fuel in the core, fertile material in the blanket, and a liquid-metal coolant, such as sodium; high-speed neutrons fission the fuel in the compact core, and the excess neutrons convert fertile material to fissionable isotopes; the breeding ratio is 1.0 or larger. Abbreviated FBR.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They begin by debunking popular misconceptions regarding global warming, the hydrogen economy, and the plutonium economy. Then they survey energy options being discusses, including coal, biomass and ethanol, diesel and biodiesel, solar and photovoltaics, and fuel cells.
This manifests the proliferation risk that led to the schism of the 1970s between the United States and several allies, with the United States advocating the once-through fuel cycle, followed by geological isolation of SNF in order to avoid the "plutonium economy." In addition to this plutonium accumulation, operational choices further exacerbate proliferation concerns; for example, plutonium is transported over considerable distances from the French reprocessing plant at La Hague to fuel fabrication plants in southern France and in Belgium.
The first is "immobilisation", which consists of vitrifying and storing weapons grade plutonium in order to discourage the creation of a plutonium economy and to restrict its mobility and thereby combat proliferation.
We're supposed to be reducing the threat of proliferation, but by going the mixed-oxide fuel route, we're laying the foundation for a plutonium economy in the future," says Makhijani.
He eschews a linear narrative in favor of a series of different ethnographic vantage points concerned with the "plutonium economy" of the Manhattan project; the different roles of weapons scientists, neighboring Pueblo nations, local communities, and antinuclear activists in navigating the "plutonium economy;" the relationship between fears of espionage and the mobilization of the national security state; and the way that a nuclear subtext informs everyday life in contemporary New Mexico, among other topics.

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