Plutus


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Plutus

 

the god of wealth in Greek mythology. Plutus was sometimes depicted as a blind old man bestowing wealth on people regardless of their moral qualities (as in Aristophanes’ comedy Plutus, 388 B.C.). He was also depicted as a boy holding a horn of plenty and being held in the arms of the goddess of peace, Eirene(as in astatuebyCephisodotus, fourth century B.C.)

Plutus

blind god of Wealth. [Gk. Lit.: Plutus]

Plutus

god of wealth: blind (indiscriminate); lame (slow to accumulate); and winged (quick to disappear). [Gk. Lit.: Plutus]
See: Wealth
References in periodicals archive ?
Experian has continued to set the bar for how a brand should interact with consumers and the financial services industry to promote financial education," said Luke Landes, founder of the Plutus Awards and the popular Website Consumerism Commentary.
After the acquirement of a project, Reliance will be responsible for its development, while Plutus will construct and manage the same for a management fee.
Plutus, Roman god of wealth and guardian of the circle of the hoarders and wasters, on the other hand, represents a being whose form of communication may be called liminal.
The conversion of Demos in The Knights and the triumph of Plutus also establish superior moral order on corrupt societies; indeed, this theme, broadly speaking, operates in most of the surviving Aristophanic plays.
Discovery Metals Limited (ASX:DML) reported high grade copper silver intersections from the Plutus deposit within its 100% owned Boseto copper project in Botswana.
46) Segal writes: "This growing tendency toward domestication and financialization culminates in the Plutus (288 BC) and then in middle comedy" (The Death of Comedy 114).
15]N isotope analysis and compares this evidence with information on diet as presented in Aristophanes' comedies (Acharnians, Plutus, Wasps).
Vindication of the Dutchess Dowager of Marlborough; Aristophanes' Plutus, the God of Riches; the Preface to Sarah Fielding's The Adventures of David Simple; The Female Husband with 'The Court Records' as a supplement; Ovid's Art of Love Paraphrased with a bibliography; the preface to Sarah Fielding's Familiar Letters between the Principal Characters in David Simple with Letters XL-XLTV; The Journal of a Voyage to Lisbon; and A Fragment of a Comment on L Bolingbroke's Essays.
My guess was that it was a humorous term for a coal miner, but it turns out to be applied to a blacksmith in Aristophanes' comedy Plutus.
The first of these poems is translated into English and discussed by Robin, 1991, 125-31, who notes the "topos of the world citizenship of the sage" (128), which she attributes as a borrowing from either Plutarch's De exilio or Aristophanes' Plutus.
Nicola Tran, who works at Plutus bonded warehouse, said: "We were still all sitting in the dark two hours later and all down the street people were out of their buildings.
The initial tableau of the production was accompanied by a clarifying speech presented by the figure of Plutus.