Plymouth Plantation


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Plymouth Plantation

first English settlement in New England (1620). [Am. Hist.: Major Bradford’s Town]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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(21.) William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation: An Electronic Edition, Early Americas Digital Archive, http://mith.umd.edu//eada/html/display.php?docs=bradford_history.xml.
" His study of these "nodal points" of national myth-making, ranging from William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation (1856) to Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique (1963), reexamines the United States" vibrant cultural heritage by demonstrating how these particular texts gathered intellectual currents already in motion and marked a turn in American life and thought.
Read is most convincing in pursuing this "incoherence" in his subsequent discussion of William Bradford, in which he poses the startling question, "Was William Bradford the first economic historian?" Offering a qualified "yes," Read demonstrates that the second section in Of Plymouth Plantation pits "community" against polyglot cosmopolitanism through its meticulous account of Plymouth's business dealings with Isaac Allerton and the Dutch.
Looking at the colony records, Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation and Morton's New English Canaan, we find only a few of the basic elements of "The May-Pole of Merry Mount" and "Endicott and the Red Cross." We also find a good many incidents that do not make their way into the fiction and the play.
and very few escaped," wrote a contemporary, William Bradford, in his History of Plymouth Plantation. And the Puritan theologian Cotton Mather wrote: "It was supposed that no less than 600 Pequot souls were brought down to hell that day." Mather was an expert on the destination of souls.
This one also goes back to the very beginning, even to the Plymouth Plantation. The Pilgrims in Plymouth were very few in number, barely 200, but already in 1627 they had to deal with a rebel named Thomas Morton, who, 25 miles away, founded his own rival colony called Merry Mount.
Goldberg's main innovation is to draw these points from texts not examined by the first "new-inventionists" - George Puttenham's Arte of English Poesie, Spenser's Shepheardes Calendar, Familiar Letters, and Astrophel, the Countess of Pembroke's "Lay of Clorinda," Marlowe's Edward II and Dido Queen of Carthage, I & II Henry IV, several Spanish colonial accounts of New World conquest, and William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation. In these discussions Goldberg persistently conveys the impression of a formidable, sophisticated mind at work, and Sodometries may strengthen the hold new-inventionism already has on literary academics and some historians in gay studies.
It is worth a place alongside Bradford's History of Plymouth Plantation, the Bible of American Puritan origins.
Indeed, in 1646 or thereabouts, William Bradford, the Puritan leader, wrote in his History of Plymouth Plantation of the first landing at Cape Cod, wherein even the glorious colors of a New England autumn were viewed as fearsome and hateful: What could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wild beasts and wild men--and what multitudes there might be of them they knew not.
In Of Plymouth Plantation Bradford looks back from 1630 to the events of ten years before.
Although we associate Thanksgiving with that first feast shared between the Wampanoags and the settlers of Plymouth Plantation in 1621, the word "thanksgiving'' was not used by Governor William Bradford until two years later.

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