Plyushkin


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Plyushkin

incredibly miserly landowner serves Tchitchikov a year-old Easter cake. [Russ. Lit.: Gogol Dead Souls]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Plyushkin's list was distinguished by its brevity of expression: quite often only the initial letters of their names appeared, followed by dots.
(10) Its conspiracy plot, detailed portraiture of town N, and antiquarianism in the grotesque figure of Plyushkin; its themes of imposture and erotic attachment leading to the "hero's" downfall, all testify to this effect.
Chichikov's visit to Plyushkin demonstrates that when such (re)functionalization stops, history stops as well.
The faint echoes of gothic romance, amplified in the following description of the colossal orchard, highlight the contrast between Wolf's Crag and Gogol's reimagined "castle." Beaten by climatic (rather than historic) calamities, awkward and inappropriate, Plyushkin's house parodies Wolf's Crag (or its literary kin) by draining the castle of its meanings.
A number of alternative terms have been proposed including Havisham's or Plyushkin's syndrome based on more appropriate literary figures [8].
Plyushkin, a miser who haggles fiercely over 120 dead souls and 78 fugitives.
Plyushkin, with whom he negotiated next, was a miser.
Eventually rumors spread through the town about Chichikov's deals with the landowners Manilov, Sobakevich, Korobochka, and Plyushkin. The obnoxious Nozdryov adds lies of his own invention to the rumors, and Chichikov finally wings his way from the town in his troika.