Pneumatic architecture

Pneumatic architecture

(1850–1880)
A term referring to a style of structures that are air-inflated, air-supported, and air-controlled. Structures generally consist of curved forms, domes, or half cylinders. Their rounded forms are organic and responsive to the technology which utilizes fabric and cables supported from within by air pressure.
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The presence of inflatables in the show (or more accurately, the documentation of such structures) positions the group as one of a number of collectives in the 1960s courting the potential of pneumatic architecture (their Italian parallels would include Archigram and Superstudio, whom Ant Farm claimed as decisive influences).
Pneumatic architecture was not only a function of technological experimentation but was meant to offer sites for communal enjoyment, participation, and education.