Point Lookout State Park

(redirected from Point Lookout, Maryland)

Point Lookout State Park


Location:On the southern tip of Saint Mary's County, at the junction of the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay. Reached by MD 5.
Facilities:143 improved campsites (27 with electric hookups, 26 with full hookups; some sites @di), 6 camper cabins, cottage, youth group camp, camp store, showers, restrooms, picnic areas (é), pavilion, playground, hiking trails, fishing pier (é), boat launch, boat rentals, museum, nature center, visitor center.
Activities:Camping, boating, flatwater canoeing, windsurfing, saltwater fishing, swimming, hiking, bicycling, interpretive programs.
Special Features:The park's peaceful surroundings belie its history as the site of a prison camp that held as many as 52,264 Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Park facilities include a Civil War Museum as well as the Marshland Nature Center. In 2006, the park sustained significant damage from Tropical Storm Ernesto. Though most facilities were reopened during the 2006 season, it is recommended that visitors contact the park to check on the status prior to making travel plans.
Address:11175 Point Lookout Rd
Scotland, MD 20687

Phone:301-872-5688
Fax:301-872-5084
Web: www.dnr.state.md.us/publiclands/southern/pointlookout.html
Size: 1,042 acres.

See other parks in Maryland.
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) Despite the notoriety of Andersonville, an estimated 14,000 Confederate POWs died in the Union camp at Point Lookout, Maryland. (6) Although HMS Ajax, Exeter and Achilles drove the pocket battleship into Montevideo Harbour, it was finally scuttled by its crew.
Twelve days later he was sent to the prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland, a notorious death trap where thousands of Confederate POWs died of tuberculosis and other diseases.
He spent the rest of the war in prison, mostly at Point Lookout, Maryland, and had quite a bit to say about his captivity as well.
The Civil War interfered with his plans for graduate study in Germany, and he served as a volunteer in the Confederate army, in 1864 captured and imprisoned for four months at Point Lookout, Maryland. He emerged from his war experiences afflicted with the tuberculosis that remained with him for the rest of his short life.