chemical polarity

(redirected from Polar covalent bonds)

chemical polarity

[′kem·i·kəl pə′lar·əd·ē]
(physical chemistry)
Tendency of a molecule, or compound, to be attracted or repelled by electrical charges because of an asymmetrical arrangement of atoms around the nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basalt fibers, which consist of inorganic oxides, have many ionic and strongly polar covalent bonds on their surfaces, whereas the organic epoxy molecules are mainly connected by non-polar or weakly polar covalent bonds.
He begins with the atomic properties of one-electron and two-electron atoms, then explains the atomic properties and periodic trends of atoms with more than two electrons, homonuclear diatomic molecules, gaseous alkali metal haloids with ionic bonds, other heteronuclear diatomic molecules with polar covalent bonds, the Lewis cubical atom model, molecular orbital calculations on heteronuclear diatomic molecules (as well as hybridization and estimation of net atomic charges from calculated electron densities), homonuclear diatomic species of certain second-period elements, structure and bonding (including in simple compounds of the Group 14 elements and those in other Groups), and electron deficient molecules.
Atoms of very similar electronegativity (less than ~0.5) share electron pairs evenly and form nonpolar covalent bonds, such as carbon and hydrogen, whereas atoms with greater (0.5-2) electronegativity differences form polar covalent bonds, with the bonds being more polar the greater the electronegativity differences.