chemical polarity

(redirected from Polar molecules)

chemical polarity

[′kem·i·kəl pə′lar·əd·ē]
(physical chemistry)
Tendency of a molecule, or compound, to be attracted or repelled by electrical charges because of an asymmetrical arrangement of atoms around the nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microwave oven functions on thermal energy by heating the polar molecules in food, a process also known as dialectic heating.
In this respect the wood can be considered to be acting similarly to a polar size exclusion chromatography column, removing small polar molecules from the liquid adhesive.
Microwave fields are a form of electromagnetic energy, and its interaction with charged particles and polar molecules leads to their agitation, which is defined as heat [11].
The material to be treated is conveyed through an electrode array where this alternating energy causes polar molecules in the material to continuously reorient themselves to face opposite poles much like the way bar magnets behave in an alternating magnetic field.
Gas hydrates are crystalline water-based solids physically resembling ice, in which small non-polar molecules (typically gases) or polar molecules with large hydrophobic moieties are trapped inside "cages" of hydrogen bonded water molecules.
Moreover, the resistance to small polar molecules, which is seldom studied in the previous researches, was investigated in this work.
Sideprojects in this proposal include the study of spinor bosonic systems in higher dimensions, bosonic polar molecules with anisotropic interactions in different geometries, polaronic effects in cold gases, and circuit quantum electrodynamics, where the strong light-matter coupling opens a different avenue for quantum simulation, but with its own challenges.
Gas hydrate is a crystalline water-based solid physically resembling ice, in which small non-polar molecules (typically gases) or polar molecules with large hydrophobic moieties are trapped inside 'cages' of hydrogen-bonded water molecules.
Smaller crude oil fractions, in which polar molecules are smaller than water molecules, lose their ability to penetrate gel pores by means of molecular sieve.
In polar molecules with one heavy atom and one light atom, electrons zoom around the heavy end quickly, like comets zipping into the solar system and past the sun.
Other subject covered include simulation techniques for dielectric photonic structures, measuring dielectric relaxation in dilute solutions of polar molecules in non-polar solvents, and practical applications of oxides obtained by modifying the dielectric constant.