corrupt

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corrupt

1. (of a text or manuscript) made meaningless or different in meaning from the original by scribal errors or alterations
2. (of computer programs or data) containing errors

corrupt

[kə′rəpt]
(computer science)
To destroy or alter information so that it is no longer reliable.
References in periodicals archive ?
He pointed out that the law would define the cases of political corruption and the authority responsible for filing reports against them to the Chief Prosecutor.
The relationship difficulties depicted in the play, Oscar Wilde's double life and the backdrop of political corruption, both fascinate and excite," says director Peter Mimmack, who developed an interest in acting at Newcastle University while studying surveying.
It is true that the security issue has many problems, and many innocent people are being killed every day, but the real strategic threat is the political issue and the issue of neighbouring countries' interference, which is an offshoot of the political corruption in Iraq".
The real tragedy for the planet is that all crimes of financial and political corruption, poverty, starvation, sex and violence are caused by individuals with these anti-social traits and that corporate controlled capitalist "democracies" reward only those who possess them at the expense of those who do not.
The real tragedy for the planet is that all crimes of financial and political corruption, poverty, wars, starvation, sex and violence are caused by individuals with these antisocial traits and that corporate-controlled capitalist "democracies" reward only those who possess them at the expense of those who do not.
Political correctness has turned into political corruption, trying to debase traditional values and standards in favour of a superficial and immoral world-view.
Tragically, the logging industry is a major driver of political corruption, environmental destruction and social instability in many Pacific countries.
They arrived weary but hopeful after two nauseating weeks across rough Atlantic seas, all in an attempt to flee the political corruption, economic downturn, and stiff religious laws that made them prisoners in their homelands.
But then explosive testimony during the second phase of the Gomery Commission examining the sponsorship scandal in Montreal revealed widespread political corruption.
There is concern, I think we would agree, about political corruption in Ottawa.