political culture

(redirected from Political cultures)

political culture

the norms, beliefs and values within a political system. It is usually assumed that a particular political culture is built up as the result of a long historical development and that its distinctive character exerts a profound influence on the form and effectiveness, or otherwise, of the political system with which it is associated. The term is most associated with the systems approach (see POLITICAL SYSTEM) within political analysis, which was in vogue in the 1950s and 60s in the US (e.g. G. Almond and S. Verba, The Civic Culture, 1965). The approach has been of most value in stimulating cross-cultural comparative research on political cultures, e.g. Almond‘s distinction between ‘participatory’, ‘subject’ and ‘parochial’ political orientations within political cultures. One central assumption of political-culture theorists is that the particular civic culture underlying liberal democracies such as the UK and the US, a mixture of participatory orientations tempered by political DEFERENCE, has been both a cause and effect of the greater political stability and effectiveness of these systems compared with other systems. From a different theoretical perspective, however, political culture can also be seen as involving cultural and ideological HEGEMONY. In this context, rather than being a sign of political effectiveness, political culture's role may be viewed as a conservative force preventing a social transition to more favourable social and political arrangements, (see also CULTURE, POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION).
References in periodicals archive ?
More specifically, the project will examine comparatively young Russians in two EU countries (Finland and Estonia) with different political cultures and analyse their activities in a particular transnational space: the Russian-language Internet-based blogosphere, the Runet .
The book Mapping Value Orientations in Central and Eastern Europe, edited by Loek Halman and Malina Voicu, presents a collection of ten articles on post-communist political cultures in Central and Eastern Europe.
It is a matter of debate whether or not there is a unified political culture within Europe - the main argument is that the continent contains a variety of different countries and cultures, and the different development and history of these countries has resulted in diverse political cultures.
The book comes out of Wesley's doctoral thesis completed at the University of Calgary and is animated by the question: Why did Canada's three prairie provinces develop such distinct political cultures over the course of the 20th century?
Wesley seeks to uncover the mystery of these undercurrents and explain why, despite common geographies, social and economic histories, settlement patterns and institutional foundations, they helped create three distinct "political cultures" Wesley, taking his lead from earlier political scientists, defines political culture as a set of common values that underpin a political system, the lens through which a community reveals itself, identifying its problems and challenges and defining the limits of acceptable solutions.
of Manchester, England) asks whether Western political cultures are undergoing a crisis in their understanding of hope.
See, in particular, Chapter 2, "Surveying and Comparing Political Cultures.
This edited volume focuses on how differing national and local political cultures in Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Peru depended on relations of power, gender, race, identity formation, and institutional structures.
Popular Liberal culture in Germany as well as other political cultures including Nazi political culture, originated in the local and regional rather than the national context.
Rather, political cultures are continually changing as new frontiers arise, the products of the interaction of population dynamics, new technologies, and new ideas; yet they retain their core values in the new contexts (Elazar, 1972; 1992; 1994).
One intriguing aspect of the book is its refutation of the theory of Samuel Huntington and Francis Fukuyama that claims that all non-Christian cultures are characteristically acquiescent to democratic changes, which implies that the political cultures of these religions "will always be authoritarian.
Naomi Chazan, "Between Liberalism and Statism: African Political Cultures and Democracy," in Larry Diamond (ed.