Cumans

(redirected from Polovtsian)

Cumans

or

Kumans

(both: ko͞o`mänz), nomadic East Turkic people, identified with the Kipchaks (or the western branch of the Kipchaks) and known in Russian as Polovtsi. Coming from NW Asian Russia, they conquered S Russia and Walachia in the 11th cent., and for almost two centuries warred intermittently with the Byzantine Empire, Hungary, and Kiev. They founded a nomadic state in the steppes along the Black Sea, and were active in commerce with Central Asia and Venice. In the early 12th cent. the main Cuman forces were defeated by the Eastern Slavs. The Mongols decisively defeated the Cumans c.1245. Some were sold as slaves, and many took refuge in Bulgaria and also in Hungary, where they were gradually assimilated into the Hungarian culture. Others joined the khanate of the Golden Horde (also called the Western Kipchaks), which was organized on the former Cuman territory in Russia.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1909 Diaghilev staged the first of the astonishing ballets, The Polovtsian Dances, in Paris, and audiences were driven wild as half naked, virile Russian male dancers hurtled down the stage whistling and shouting.
The Mariinsky Ballet will perform Borodin's famous Polovtsian dances in a spectacular scene that provides one of the opera's many thrilling climaxes.
This wind's so brutal, it's good I've got Polovtsian slits for eyes.
Maestro Groner also notes "Borodin's Polovtsian Dances were chosen in collaboration with our wonderful chorus director Dr.
The Polovtsian Dances ranged from that lovely tune that became Stranger in Paradise to barbaric themes fit for the court of Khan Konchak.
Performing to "The Polovtsian Dances," Chen is the first skater in the world to land five clean quadruple jumps in a competition.
3; Alexander Borodin's "Polovtsian" Dances; and finishes with P.I.
One section he did complete was the famous Polovtsian Dances and these charming and familiar short tunes have enduring appeal.
Complete transcriptions of the original orchestrations of finales to Shostakovich's 5th Symphony and Tchaikovsky's 4th Symphony, Borodin's Polovtsian Marches and Polovtsian Dances, Glinka's Ruslan & Ludmila Overture and its derivative Festive Overture by Shostakovich, Prokofiev's Troika and movements from Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, obviously do not cater to the lowest common denominator.
They excelled in Polonaise from Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, and Puccini's Intermezzo from Manon Lescaut before a pulsating finale with Polovtsian Dances (Borodin's Prince Igor).
2f of the traditional version: Bulycheva calls it "Princely Song" in English, an all too literary translation of the Russian "Knyashaya pesnya"), the final chorus of what traditionally is act 1, the vocal parts of the Polovtsian dances, and the peasants' chorus from the final tableau (no.