Polychromy


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Polychromy

The practice of decorating architectural elements or sculpture in a variety of colors.

Polychromy

 

the production of works of applied art, sculpture, and architecture in no fewer than two colors. Polychromy is achieved by using variously colored materials or different pigments.

polychromy

The practice of decorating architectural elements, sculpture, etc., in a variety of colors.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no point at which we can trace the beginning of polychromy," says Schmidt.
The bright surge rolled through the nave full of the odor of decay, hurriedly swept past the walls covered with peeling polychromy, and broke right on the iconostasis.
The Spanish, on the other hand, preferred the more flamboyant, baroque style, with ornate carving, polychromy, gold leaf and lacquer work.
It is known that Darbishire was interested in structural polychromy and was influenced by some industrial architecture.
Bid document - LV 138 -Innenputz-repainting-Rabitzgewlbe, 410,00 m2 heating plaster;1 000,00 m2 insulating plaster;2 200,00 m2 lime plaster;170,00 m2 Rabitzgewlbe;4 400,00 m2 Smooth lime;4 900,00 m2 Polychromy wall;Staircase: cast iron Fa Joly Wittenberg;.
As Clemente Marconi, a professor in the history of Greek art and archaeology at New York University (and one of a group of experts with whom the artist consulted while making this work), explained in a handout, "[f]ar from being a process of reconstructing the original polychromy of these ancient sculptures, this was an act of interpreting their carved forms through paint.
Exhibition spaces are the usual neutral containers, but no two are volumetrically or experientially the same, and there is more exquisite tension between the clinically understated interiors and the weathered polychromy of medieval saints, saviours and madonnas.
Walgate adjusts her palette according to her needs, from full and vibrant polychromy to sober monochrome effects and here, the analogous range of purples through blues to greens, drawn from dreams of the Canadian prairies, slant this piece toward melancholy, testy with tension.
The color of life; polychromy in sculpture from antiquity to present.
Multi-armed Bodhisattva Guanyin, Vietnam, late 17th-early 18th century, Wood with lacquer and polychromy, Late Le Dynasty, promised gift of Dr.
Bothmer's description of the sculpture is meticulously detailed; he informs us of facts that are no longer evident about the piece, such as that upon its discovery evidence of polychromy was preserved on its surface.
16) Underpinned in Europe by the incarnational structure or late medieval religion and the even broader tendency to concretism or reification, faith became more affective, demonstrating a "strong visual quality which encouraged it to use statues and paintings of Christ and the saints as sources of inspiration and aids to meditation," (17) almost simultaneously, advances in artistic production, especially polychromy, tridimentional perspective, and an improved understanding of anatomy, gave to images the appearance of reality.