Polychromy


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Polychromy

The practice of decorating architectural elements or sculpture in a variety of colors.

Polychromy

 

the production of works of applied art, sculpture, and architecture in no fewer than two colors. Polychromy is achieved by using variously colored materials or different pigments.

polychromy

The practice of decorating architectural elements, sculpture, etc., in a variety of colors.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was something moving in the amateur polychromy imitating stone cornices, columns, and pilasters--distant memories of the sanctuaries of Jerusalem and Constantinople, perhaps a vision of the New Jerusalem.
in 2008, this beautifully illustrated, oversized (9x12") catalogue is notable for its initial 5 essays, which discuss the polychromy of sculpture in ancient Greece and Rome, the medieval and baroque West, and in modern times.
Bothmer's description of the sculpture is meticulously detailed; he informs us of facts that are no longer evident about the piece, such as that upon its discovery evidence of polychromy was preserved on its surface.
16) Underpinned in Europe by the incarnational structure or late medieval religion and the even broader tendency to concretism or reification, faith became more affective, demonstrating a "strong visual quality which encouraged it to use statues and paintings of Christ and the saints as sources of inspiration and aids to meditation," (17) almost simultaneously, advances in artistic production, especially polychromy, tridimentional perspective, and an improved understanding of anatomy, gave to images the appearance of reality.
The chapel was outfitted with the best polychromy and statues; Barocci's altarpiece was its final touch.
figure 76, on the Acropolis from the west) show why it is important to add colour to illustrations of the built environment: the standing monuments hardly have any traces of the original polychromy and are now the colour of their raw materials, and it is quite difficult to appreciate how the painted details of the buildings emphasized certain parts of the architecture.
Some pictures, all sober grays, off-whites, and murky tans, seemed almost colorless, until your eye adjusted to take in their unpredictable polychromy.
The viscerality of these early pieces is not sustained in the later works, which instead, rely on monumental scale and zinging polychromy for effect.
While Jean-Claude de Crousaz's manner is sometimes inspired by Japanese aesthetics--with its marked predilection for asymmetry, gestural spontaneousness or the use of a subdued polychromy imposed by the ceramic medium--it is only to better serve a decorative vocabulary which is entirely his own.
A new vocabulary transformed an aesthetics of materials already present in the polychromy and rich spolia of the city's fabric with inlay, carving, molding, painting, and gilding of precious marbles, stucco, and wood in all'antica motifs present in new books illustrated and printed in Venice, such as the Hypnerotomachia Polifili (1499).
The relentlessly patterned backgrounds of a pair of Gustav Klimt figure paintings or the sinuous curves of an Adolf Loos chair, the luxurious wood and exotic inlay of an Otto Wagner chest or the opulent polychromy of a brooch by Josef Hoffmann take on new meanings when they are seen against Carrere & Hastings's classical pilasters.
Jenkins, by contrast, is alert -- and sympathetic -- to polychromy both in antiquity and in the decorative history of his workplace.