Polygalaceae


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Related to Polygalaceae: milkwort family

Polygalaceae

[‚päl·i·gə′lās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A family of dicotyledonous plants in the order Polygalales distinguished by having a bicarpellate pistil and monadelphous stamens.

Polygalaceae

 

a family of dicotyledonous plants. Members are grasses, shrubs, lianas, and less often small trees. The leaves are entire, are usually alternate, and lack stipules. The flowers are monoecious, more or less irregular, and gathered into racemose, spicate, or paniculate inflorescences. There are five sepals, of which the two side ones are usually larger than the others and are petal-like; there are usually three developed petals. There are eight stamens, rarely less; they are usually accreted with filaments. The fruit is usually a boll. There are approximately 14 genera (about 900 species) found almost everywhere except New Zealand, Polynesia, and the arctic. Only the Polygala species grow in the USSR. Some plants of the Polygalaceae family are used as medicine, food, or ornamentals.

REFERENCES

Takhtadzhian, A.L. Sistema i filogeniia tsvetkovykh rastenii. Moscow-Leningrad, 1966.
Hutchinson, J. The Genera of Flowering Plants, vol. 2. Oxford, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
The genus name, Polygala, is a derivation of Greek words meaning "much milk." Folk tales suggest that eating plants in the milkwort (Polygalaceae) family will increase the milk production of nursing mothers and dairy cows.
In total, 15 trees of the genus Aporusa (Euphorbiaceae) were fogged, 6 trees of Xanthophyllum affine (Polygalaceae) and 9 trees of various other genera (for details see Horstmann et al.
The first samara type represents the genus Securidaca (Polygalaceae).
It is a member of the Milkwort Polygalaceae family.
After optimizing a multistate character where Rosid 1B had been further divided into two subclades (1B1: Fabaceae and Polygalaceae; 1B2: remaining families, see Appendix 1) indicated that the ancestral host plant family most likely was Fabaceae (as Polygalaceae is a very minor host).
peltata Hance 59 Polygalaceae Polygala bawanglingensis F.W.Xing & Z.X.Li 60 Dryopteridaceae Polystichum kwangtungense Ching 61 Pteridaceae Pteris changjiangensis X.-L.Zheng & F.-W.Xing 62 Pteridaceae Pteris decrescens Christ 63 Pteridaceae Pteris majestica Ching ex Ching et S.