Polyhymnia


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Polyhymnia

(pŏl'ĭhĭm`nēə): see MusesMuses,
in Greek religion and mythology, patron goddesses of the arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Originally only three, they were later considered as nine. Calliope was the Muse of epic poetry and eloquence; Euterpe, of music or of lyric poetry; Erato, of the poetry of
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.

Polyhymnia

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Polyhymnia, asteroid 33 (the 33rd asteroid to be discovered, on October 28, 1854), is approximately 62 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 4.8 years. Polyhymnia is named after the Greek muse of singing, mime, rhetoric, and sacred dance, who was a daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne and whose symbol is the veil. Like its mythological namesake, the asteroid Polyhymnia confers talent in singing, dance, mime, and rhetoric to natives in whose chart it is prominent.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Polyhymnia

 

in Greek mythology, one of the nine Muses, the patroness of sacred hymns and of music.

Polyhymnia

muse of lyric poetry; presided over singing. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 849]
See: Harmony

Polyhymnia

Muse of sacred song. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 172]
See: Music

Polyhymnia

Greek myth the Muse of singing, mime, and sacred dance
References in periodicals archive ?
And this may be the consequence of Sancho's choice, since Polyhymnia (one of the muses he refused) presides over the sacred: a choice that leads to Sancho's lamentations.
The group uses period instruments to perform the ``Praetorius'' Christmas Mass and carols from the Polyhymnia 1619.
Some of her featured roles with Pennsylvania Ballet include Dew Drop in George Balanchine's The Nutcracker, Polyhymnia in Balanchine's Apollo and a soloist in Lynn Taylor Corbett's Great Galloping Gottschalk.
85), and the text itself consists of a conversation between Brahms and Polyhymnia on Mount Parnassus, which is interspersed with musical inserts and in which Brahms finally asserts that "all the arts are essentially one and indivisible.
Polyhymnia begins her racing career in the fall of 2006 and the interest terminates upon the filly's retirement.
He acknowledges that there is only one condition, namely that two of the daughters of Memory, the muses, Euterpe and Polyhymnia, should do their duty and guarantee "remembrance" of his work.