Polynices

(redirected from Polyneices)
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Polynices

(pŏl'ənī`sēz): see Seven against ThebesSeven against Thebes,
in Greek legend, seven heroes—Polynices, Adrastus, Amphiaraüs, Hippomedon, Capaneus, Tydeus, and Parthenopaeus—who made war on Eteocles, king of Thebes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Antigone reveals herself as the daughter of patricidal and incestuous oedipus, the daughter of oedipus's mother and wife Jocasta, and the sister of treacherous Polyneices and Eteocles (Rutter 114).
And again: "O my brother, Polyneices, name most dear to me
50) This image reminded me of the contrasting fates of the corpses of the embattled Theban royal twins Eteocles and Polyneices at the start of Sophocles' Antigone, where Eteocles is given burial rights, but Polyneices is left to rot.
As Moya Lloyd explains it, Antigone's choice: "exposes the weakness in paternal law, for that law cannot make her give up her 'impossible and death-bent incestuous love of her brother' Polyneices or compel her to assume a 'normal' heterosexual position" (quoted in Lloyd 2007, 96).
From Oedipus' father, Lauis, to his sons, Polyneices and Eteocles, the myth moves from homosexual rape to threatened childlessness and then to incest and the father's deadly curse on his sons.
UK) has produced a companion to the final play of the great ancient Greek playwright, Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus, in which he returns to the character of Oedipus, now an aged man who has come into conflict with his son, Polyneices, over a planned attack on Thebes.
Antigone learns of Creon's order that her brother Polyneices,
Creon decrees that the body of her brother, Polyneices, remain in a field to rot, as a just reward for treason.
When her brother Polyneices is killed in battle, he is denied proper burial for being a traitor to the state.
For example, in Antigone, Creon is the source of conflict by prohibiting a proper burial for Antigone's brother, Polyneices.
If Polyneices, even after death, had to suffer for his impudence in his "unsepulchred," "unburied shame" and exposed to the elements as "a welcome store for the birds, as they espy him, to feast on at will," then black Americans, likewise, for their real or imagined impudence had to suffer the indignity of being similarly exposed to the elements, of being the "fruit for the crows to pluck/for the rain to gather/for the wind to suck/for the sun to rot/[and finally] for the tree to drop" (Holiday, "Strange Fruit").
According to Djebar, Cherifa, who mourns her brother, resembles Antigone, who was distressingly torn between the law and her sense of duty toward the burial of her brother, Polyneices.