Polynesian


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Related to Polynesian: Polynesian islands, Polynesian language

Polynesian

1. of or relating to Polynesia, its people, or any of their languages
2. a member of the people that inhabit Polynesia, generally of Caucasoid features with light skin and wavy hair
3. a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian family of languages, including Maori and Hawaiian and a number of other closely related languages of the S and central Pacific
References in periodicals archive ?
8) The collection was ultimately broken up and dispersed in 1806 in a 65-day sale, which saw most of his ethnographic objects leave Britain to fulfil other European nations' thirst for Polynesian works.
Truly living the island culture wouldn't be complete without an authentic luau featuring the world's largest Polynesian night show.
Previous evidence suggested that Polynesians settled Rapa Nui around 1200.
The Polynesians brought traditional techniques, but changed decorative features as they colonised new island groups.
The Polynesian culture is on the rise," said UO defensive end Will Tukuafu, who is Tongan.
At the end of the voyage, the two double canoes will be presented to the inhabitants of the Polynesian islands of Tikopia and Anuta, acknowledging the debt owed by Western yachtsmen to the Polynesian inspiration for their modern catamarans.
About 60 percent of the team is black, 20 percent is Latino and the rest is white, Polynesian or "other.
According to legends recounted by today's Polynesian islanders, their ancient ancestors built canoes with sails in which they sailed south from the Hawaiian islands to Tahiti.
Two Australian tourists, two European Union officials and a group of Polynesian environmental and tourism officials were among the 20 people aboard the Twin Otter DHC6 turboprop when it crashed on Thursday, French officials said.
They will also be working with Polynesian artists who are visiting the Captain Cook Birthplace Museum.
It notes that in the New Zealand Anglican church, Maori church communities reside in five bishoprics and meet as a self-governing part of the whole Anglican church in New Zealand, which also includes Polynesian and European communities.
Before Europeans arrived in New Zealand there were Polynesian inhabitants, called Maori.