Polyphemus

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Polyphemus

(pŏlĭfē`məs), in Greek mythology, a Cyclops. He was a shepherd and the son of Poseidon. In the Odyssey, Polyphemus imprisoned Odysseus and his men in his cave. They gave him wine and then, when he was drunk, they blinded him and escaped, hiding under Polyphemus' sheep as they left the cave. A later legend tells of the giant's futile love for the nymph GalateaGalatea
, in Greek mythology. 1 Sea nymph, daughter of Nereus and Doris. She was loved by the brutish Polyphemus, a Cyclops who wooed her with love songs; but Galatea loved Acis, the handsome son of a river nymph.
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Polyphemus

Cyclops blinded by Odysseus. [Gk. Myth.: Odyssey]

Polyphemus

cruel monster; one of the Cyclopes. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]

Polyphemus

crushes lover’s lover. [Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
References in periodicals archive ?
(67.) A useful chart that lists the number of eyes of Polyphemus in various works of ancient art can be found in Amy Smith, "'Homeric' Art in Ancient Greece: The Case of Polyphemos," Proceedings of the Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution 9 (2005), retrieved from http://www.brlsi.org/ events-proceedings/proceedings/25019.
Drunk and sick, the monster fell "backwards and a deep sleep took hold upon him." Odysseus and his men then thrust a burning beam of wood into the monster's eye "till the boiling blood bubbled all over it as we worked it round and round." The Cyclops cried and shouted "in a frenzy of rage and pain," alerting his friends that Nobody was killing him, "by fraud or by force." For Odysseus and his friends, the problem now was how to get out of the cave when Polyphemos moved the huge bolder to let the sheep out in the morning.
Are you being attacked in there?" Polyphemos replies, "Nobody is attacking me!
Daniel Peretti applies folk-tale analysis tools to the climactic Mount Doom scene of The Lord of the Rings, finding intriguing roots in the "ogre blinded" motif most familiar to readers from the Polyphemos episode of The Odyssey.
Odysseus only truly begins this arduous journey to self realization after he commits hubris in Book 9, when he transgresses the code of hospitality and then vaunts over the blinded Polyphemos. By the end of the epic, the hero has successfully fused his pre-war and post-war personae in the battle against the suitors.
9 What an excellent charm for the love-lorn Polyphemos found!
This is the condition of Polyphemos's cave, which is a trigger for Odysseus's wile.
14.466, 18.240, 331, 19.122, 21.293-294), strongly suggests that dilution of wine with water is what a Homeric audience would have understood, particularly in view of the Polyphemos episode in Odyssey 9.
He may greet them with soft words and warm embraces, but those who can remember Grendel and Polyphemos from their youthful reading of poetry will recognize him, passing by and introducing themselves only as 'Nobody.' The swimmers are well past tiring from the journey, and so it is here, in the Kingdom of the Water-Snakes that they will have to learn prayer, if they would swim past the reptilian scientists and achieve the farther shore.
In the Odyssey, Polyphemos' curse, honored by his father Poseidon, condemns Odysseus to a long and rough journey home, loss of his companions, and a troubled return.
In The Odyssey, the eye/I conjunction underscores both Polyphemos's monomaniacal power and Odysseus's individual resistance--the assumption of solipsistic godhead on one hand, and the inner voice of reason, God, or social consciousness on the other.
The earliest written variant of AT 1137 comes from Book IX of The Odyssey, when Odysseus encounters the Cyclops Polyphemos (Bk.