Polyphonic Singing

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Polyphonic Singing

 

(in Russian, mnogogolosie), music based on the combination of two or more simultaneous voices; the opposite of monody.

Heterophony, homophony, and polyphony are different types of polyphonic singing. Heterophony is typical of various folk cultures; for example, in Russian folk songs, a lead voice is joined by a supporting voice (podgolosok). Homophony and polyphony are outgrowths of heterophony. Various types of polyphonic singing can be combined simultaneously.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
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