Polysyndeton


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Related to Polysyndeton: polyptoton, epistrophe

Polysyndeton

 

a sentence structure in which all or almost all homogeneous words or clauses are connected by the same conjunction (in Russian, most often by i, “and”). Usually, only the last two homogeneous members of a sentence are linked by a conjunction. Polysyndeton is used to emphasize the close relatedness of the connected words or clauses. Polysyndeton was frequently used in Russian folk songs (most often with the Rus-sian conjunction a, “and,” “but”). [16-1111-^]

References in periodicals archive ?
here hendiadys and polysyndeton mark, in a breathless flow, a knot in the narrative, the tragic confrontation.
Doody interprets the polysyndeton of the passage this way: "To the arrival scene in Pamplona, however, these same and's are spoken in a more active voice that imparts a rush of enthusiasm to Jake's happy first impressions" (105).
In lyric, relatively short, simple, paratactic sentence structures, linked in parallel with one another by polysyndeton or asyndeton and a use of conjunctions denoting similarity or spatiotemporal continguity, tend to be preferred over long, complicated, hypotactic sentences and conjunctions denoting precise logical relations; and, more broadly, exemplification tends to be privileged over entailment, similarity over consequence, induction over syllogism.
In listing the natural victims of Orlando's rage, Ariosto's use of polysyndeton ("rami e ceppi e tronchi e sassi e zolle") takes us back to a prior instance of such cataloguing when Medoro pleads in his epithalamion that no shephered do damage "all'erbe, all'ombre, all'antro, al rio, alle piante.
Although also using the scheme called klimax (Greek) or scala (Roman), progressing from a mundane one hundred days reminiscent of Franklin Roosevelt's beginning presidency to an epochal lifetime on this planet, Kennedy's preferred polysyndeton therein was honed in June 1945.
Parataxis, the pervasive passive voice, polysyndeton, underlie McGahern's music, apparently, and the ineffable poise which encodes experience both familiar and impossible to plumb must, after all, be an effect achieved through words and the placing of words.
She is also under no illusions about the potential (and potentially vast) distance between author and manuscript, admitting, for instance, that the appearance of polysyndeton in a given text may easily have been created by a scribal rather than an authorial preference for, and insertion of, conjunctions (30).
All of the figures mentioned so far demonstrate Carlin's magnificent sensitivity to prose written and spoken; the same is true of the devices of repetition: antanaclasis, ploce, polysyndeton, antimetabole, polyptoton, pseudo-zeugma.
The point is well made as this type of repeated structure, along with the insistent dual strategies of polysyndeton and asyndeton (with a tendency towards parataxis), is a key element and consistent feature of Rodoreda's prose.
The polysyndeton (see below) and obsolete language ("mine eyes") in the passage are, for me, anyway, a more convincing demonstration of Poe's "biblical" language.
At most they serve to underline other stylistic devices, notably polysyndeton, and may perhaps be said to reinforce the characteristic immediacy, energy, and disruptiveness of Dante's language.