Polysyndeton


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Polysyndeton: polyptoton, epistrophe
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Polysyndeton

 

a sentence structure in which all or almost all homogeneous words or clauses are connected by the same conjunction (in Russian, most often by i, “and”). Usually, only the last two homogeneous members of a sentence are linked by a conjunction. Polysyndeton is used to emphasize the close relatedness of the connected words or clauses. Polysyndeton was frequently used in Russian folk songs (most often with the Rus-sian conjunction a, “and,” “but”). [16-1111-^]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To interpret the accumulation of the coordinating conjunction and in this case as conveying Jake's enthusiasm is certainly debatable, as are other interpretations of the effects of polysyndeton in other passages.
As Demetrius observed about polysyndeton, "repetition of the same connective" heightens "the impression of large numbers" (63).
His final sentence as peroration combined Classical polysyndeton with klimax or scala for grandeur derived by increasing the number of letters or syllables in successive words lauding "liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!" (17) In a noteworthy address at West Point in 1962, General Douglas MacArthur repeatedly had intoned, with Spartan asyndeton, "Duty, Honor, Country"; now, the U.S.
One eventually becomes accustomed to the rhythm of this concatenation of adjectives and clauses, the alternation of polysyndeton and asyndeton, the surfeit that overflows in every overextended sentence.
blood and profit ...": here hendiadys and polysyndeton mark, in a breathless flow, a knot in the narrative, the tragic confrontation.
Figures of repetition also abound: polysyndeton, synonymy, anaphora.
All of the figures mentioned so far demonstrate Carlin's magnificent sensitivity to prose written and spoken; the same is true of the devices of repetition: antanaclasis, ploce, polysyndeton, antimetabole, polyptoton, pseudo-zeugma.
Here the protagonist bemoans--and not with movingly plangent rhythm enhanced by anaphora, polysyndeton, and zeugma--the precarious nature of her efforts to make ends meet and run a family.
We go back to the colonial era in American history for our earliest reading - Jonathan Edwards's sermon "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God." This text demonstrates, first, some typical aspects of the Puritan sermon - its appeal to reason (logos), for instance, and illustrates some rhetorical and stylistic devices that we would expect in sermons, such as dialogismus, Biblical parataxis and polysyndeton, epicrisis, cataplexis, categoria, dehortatio, adhortatio, oraculum, and protrope.
In addition to these, further stylistic features we examine that characterize Huck's speech specifically include run-on sentences, polysyndeton, transitional words and phrases, linear, right-branching syntax, parelcon, and humorous similes.
Unfamiliar with the language of the King James Bible and untrained in the rhetorical tradition, Logan nevertheless employs several stylistic features of Biblical prose (parallelism, hyperbaton, repetition, polysyndeton) and other classical tropes and schemes (dialogismus, proecthesis, praemunitio, polyptoton, and a strikingly pathetic instance of hypophora).
POLYSYNDETON: the use of conjunctions (such as and or or) in a series of words, phrases or clauses.