Polytrichum

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Polytrichum

 

a genus of plants of the class Musci. Of the approximately 100 species, more than ten are found in the USSR, in the mountains, forests, swamps, and tundra. The most common species is Polytrichum commune, which is distributed in marshy taiga evergreen forests. They grow in large pulvinate clumps of turf. The stem, which is densely covered with leaves that have assimilative lamellae on their upper sides, reaches a height of 40 cm. The plant produces an abundance of spores. The capsule containing the spores is located on a long stalk that is structurally different from the stalks of other representatives of the class Musci. The top of the capsule is covered with calyptera, which have downwardly directed pili (resembling flax yarn) and easily fall off. This plant’s turf-like growth and its leaf structure cause a surface accumulation of moisture and lead to the formation of marshes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protonema suspension cultures of the medicinal moss Polytrichum juniperinum.
Changes in nitrate reductase activity and oxidative stress response in the moss Polytrichum commune subjected to chromium, copper and zinc phytotoxicity.
uliginosum) and moss-lichen underbrush (Pleurozium schreberi, Hylocomium splendens, Polytrichum alpestre, Cladonia arbuscula, C.
Longton RE (1972) Reproduction of Antarctic mosses in the genera Polytrichum and Psilopilum with particular reference to temperature.
While the predominant vegetation type on both kame fields is pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest, the riparian vegetation varied between sampling sites, reflecting variable moisture conditions containing for example Polytrichum commune L., Sphagnum spp., Equisetum spp., and Alnus incana L.
It grows as saxi-terricolous in hollows or slight depressions of acidic rocks, in open sites exposed to wind, sun, rain or snow, with Polytrichum juniperinum Hedw., Tortula Hedw.
When the temperature rises on Baffin Island, in the Canadian high Arctic, ancient Polytrichum mosses, trapped beneath the ice for thousands of years, are exposed.
(lichens), Flavocetraria cucullata (curled snow lichen), and Polytrichum spp.
This increase in species number was mainly determined by spread out of pioneer early succesional herb species (Calamagrostis epigejos, Equisetum hyemale, Pteridium aquilinum, Rubus idaeus, R saxatilis, Scorzonera humilis, Solidago virgaurea, Ceratodon purpureus, Polytrichum juniperinum).
patens, namely, Timmia austriaca (class Bryopsida, subclass Timmiidae), Tetraphis pellucida (class Tetraphidopsida), Bartramiopsis lescurii (class Polytrichopsida), Polytrichum commune (class Polytrichopsida), Andreaea rupistris (class Andreaeopsida), Oedipodium griffithianum (class Oedipodiopsida), and Sphagnum squarrosum (class Sphagnopsida).