Polyxena


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Polyxena

(pōlĭk`sĭnə), in Greek mythology, daughter of Priam and Hecuba. After the death of Achilles, she was claimed by his ghost and was sacrificed at his tomb. According to later legends Achilles loved her and was treacherously killed while meeting with her; therefore he demanded her sacrifice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some intervening text is needed to account for this change of emphasis and shift in characterisation from the cruel murderer of Priam, Astyanax and Polyxena to the beneficent protector of Delphi and Greece.
Polyxena is a shooting star that wipes itself across the play and disappears.
In Hecuba, Odysseus transmits the demand of the Greek army that Polyxena be sacrificed as a prize of honor for Achilles's grave; in the Trojan Women, while Cassandra, Polyxena, and Hecuba are to be given away to the victors, (3) the only sacrifice involves Astyanax, and one that is required solely by the will of Odysseus who "got his way" from the Greeks.
The original opens with a messenger recounting a recent appearance of the ghost of Achilles, who vengefully calls for the sacrifice of Polyxena.
In the former, Ajax learns that when he was in a crazed state he was attacking cattle not the Greeks as he thought; and in the latter, Hekabe learns that what she thought was her daughter's attendance at Achilles's tomb actually meant that her daughter Polyxena was dead.
In the process of telling her own tale Cassandra clarifies a number of what have become legendary relationships from a variety of angles: those of Helen and Paris, Polyxena and Achilles, Penthesileia and Achilles, Andromache and Hector, and Hecabe and Priam are the most prominent among them.
In some cases there is a confusion of names, for example in the scene from Act II where Agamemnon is in dialogue with Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, who is demanding that Polyxena should be sacrificed to his father's shade.
Furthermore, by focusing on youths who die as a result of [epsilon][rho][omega][zeta] the songs foreshadow Achilles' own death for the love of Polyxena.
The imagery conveying his martial exploits gradually increases in violence to culminate with the human sacrifice of the Trojan virgin Polyxena, loved by Achilles and immolated on his tomb by his son Neoptolemus as a revenge for his father's death.
At this point in the poem Hecuba has invited Achilles to the Trojan temple of Apollo to discuss a possible marriage between him and her daughter Polyxena.
In Euripides' Hecuba, the assembly of the Greek army resolve to sacrifice Polyxena to the ghost of Achilles (218-21).