Polyxena


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Polyxena

(pōlĭk`sĭnə), in Greek mythology, daughter of Priam and Hecuba. After the death of Achilles, she was claimed by his ghost and was sacrificed at his tomb. According to later legends Achilles loved her and was treacherously killed while meeting with her; therefore he demanded her sacrifice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Euripides mentions Polyxena, but she does not appear in his version.
The Trojan Cressida serves as a kind of stand in for Polyxena as Achilles and Patroclus scurry to get in line also, not wanting, apparently, to miss a chance to kiss Cressida.
Les noms de Mme de Stael et de George Sand sont en effet regulierement mentionnes, quoique comme en passant: on apprend ainsi que la slovene Pavlina Pajk ou la roumaine Eugenia Scriban vouaient un veritable culte a Sand, ou encore que Mme de Stael faisait l'objet d'une tres grande admiration de la part de Polyxena Wesselenyi et de la roumaine Maria Flechtenmacher.
On the comparison of Polyxena to a statue, see Steiner 2001, 197, 206; on the visual arts and the thematization of spectacle in Euripidean tragedy more generally, see Zeitlin 1994.
Faire Polyxena neuer was so faire: Nor she that was proud loue to Troylus.
523-68) and Seneca (Trojan Women 1118-64) make him inexorable in his execution of Polyxena.
When Hecuba's servant returns from the sacrifice of Polyxena with a body in winding cloth, Hecuba believes that her daughter has been returned to her for burial.
Polyxchene" is Polyxena, one of king Priam's daughters and the lover of Achilles.
The sculpture garden at the Ringling holds four colossi in the center section, larger-than-life stone variant reproductions of Renaissance works memorializing famous scenes of violence: the rape of the Sabine women, the rape of Polyxena, the flaying of Marsyas, and the rape of Proserpina, who was called Persephone by the ancient Greeks.
A Polyxena Spinola la reviste de la amanerada perspectiva de la moda genovesa en su etapa italiana.
She watches her daughter Polyxena led away to be sacrificed to Achilles and falls flat on the ground in despair.
Aeneas's tale of the fall of Troy and his abandonment of four women to their deaths--his wife Creusa, his cousins Cassandra and Polyxena, and his queen Hecuba--actuates a pattern of selfish, uncaring behavior, which is then replayed in his abandonment of Dido.