Polyxena


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Polyxena

(pōlĭk`sĭnə), in Greek mythology, daughter of Priam and Hecuba. After the death of Achilles, she was claimed by his ghost and was sacrificed at his tomb. According to later legends Achilles loved her and was treacherously killed while meeting with her; therefore he demanded her sacrifice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Euripides mentions Polyxena, but she does not appear in his version.
The Trojan Cressida serves as a kind of stand in for Polyxena as Achilles and Patroclus scurry to get in line also, not wanting, apparently, to miss a chance to kiss Cressida.
In Trojan Women, we witness the pathos of the mother who loses her daughters one by one, Cassandra to become concubine to Agamemnon, Polyxena to be sacrificed at Achilles's tomb, and who is left alone at the end of the play with the body of her murdered grandchild.
De meme la hongroise Polyxena Wesselenyi ou la polonaise Maria Wirtemberska, dans leurs recits de voyage, optent pour une ecriture qui, selon les standards etablis par les hommes, est immediatement reperable comme feminine (importance accordee aux sentiments et problemes politiques systematiquement passes sous silence).
Polyxena, for example, will have been represented by a male performer for her onstage role in Euripides' Hecuba.
Bremmer, "Myth and Ritual in Greek Human Sacrifice: Lykaon, Polyxena and the Case of the Rhodian Criminal," in The Strange World of Human Sacrifice, ed.
For instance, Helen tells the stories of Cassandra, Briseis, Polyxena, and Iphigenia to explain women's sufferings.
Faire Polyxena neuer was so faire: Nor she that was proud loue to Troylus.
523-68) and Seneca (Trojan Women 1118-64) make him inexorable in his execution of Polyxena. According to our mythological sources, (10) Neoptolemos visited Delphi after the fall of Troy either to hold Apollo to account for the death of Achilles at Troy, or to plunder the temple, or to offer Trojan spoils to Apollo, or to consult the oracle about the barrenness of Hermione.
As one's homeland falls, your future becomes horribly uncertain..."Polyxena" is a story of the classical world, where the titular woman, daughter of the King of Troy, struggles with the romance of her conquerors and their pursuit of her.
Unsurprisingly, they seek to subjugate women using physical force and they are quite merciless, as when in the play Iphigenia asks her relative Polyxena: "Tell me.
When Hecuba's servant returns from the sacrifice of Polyxena with a body in winding cloth, Hecuba believes that her daughter has been returned to her for burial.