Pomeranchuk Theorem

Pomeranchuk theorem

[¦päm·ə¦rän·chək ‚thir·əm]
(particle physics)
The theorem that if the total cross section both for scattering of a particle by a given target particle and for scattering of its antiparticle by the same target particle, approach a limit at high energies, and do so sufficiently rapidly, then these limits must be the same.

Pomeranchuk Theorem

 

in quantum field theory, a theorem asserting that the total effective interaction cross section of a particle and antiparticle with the same target tend toward the same limit as the collision energy increases. The Pomeranchuk theorem was formulated by I. Ia. Pomeranchuk in 1958 on the basis of the general postulates of quantum field theory and the assumption that the process of the scattering of strongly interacting particles, or hadrons, is diffractive in character with a constant radius of interaction. A. A. Logunov generalized the Pomeranchuk theorem for differential cross sections and analyzed the conditions of its applicability for radii of interaction that increase with energy.