poorhouse

(redirected from Poor house)
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Related to Poor house: poor farm

poorhouse

(formerly) a publicly maintained institution offering accommodation to the poor

poorhouse

A building, often supported by a community or by a religious organization, that provide housing and minimal services for the indigent; also See almshouse and bettering house.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Poor House is being marketed by Yorkshire's Finest.
Early nineteenth-century governments began to assist abandoned children through orphanages and poor houses, though many beneficent societies were associated with the Catholic Church or lay brotherhoods.
Under the new wing of St James Hospital lies the city's old poor house.
Latin Americanists, along with social and urban historians, will discover much of interest in this, the first book-length study of the Poor House ever published.
Although an institution of enclosure like the earlier colonial convents and retreats for respectable women, the Poor House represented new attitudes on the part of both clerics and secular officials.
Using real locations and untrained actors - which was more or less unheard of until the Italians started doing it in earnest in the mid-1940s - De Sica fully involves us in the desperation of a poor house painter (Lamberto Maggiorani) who faces ruin when his only transportation is stolen.
Water Purifier with last point Purification System etc in the office of HMB (D) Poor House GSSSB RCC and HCGBS Sewa Kutir Kingsway Camp Delhi.
One way of looking at it is that the nation is still on the road to the poor house - but at a slower pace.
Between 1700 and 1704 the city council of Leipzig, in central Germany, presided over the construction of a new, large combination poor house, orphanage, insane asylum, and penitentiary named St.
He was confined in chains in a dark cell in the poor house, where he prayed, issued commands "in a loud voice, as the comma[n]der of a large army," and was attended regularly by a physician.
Like the rich man in Jesus' parable about the beggar Lazarus (Luke 16), Ebenezer Scrooge is callously indifferent to the poor just outside his home--arguing that prisons and poor houses are enough to meet their needs--and it is his failure to see the ties binding him to beggars and urchins that condemns him.