Pop architecture

Pop architecture

(1962–1974)
A style which refers to structures that symbolically represent objects, to fantastic designs for vast sculptures on an architectural scale, or to any architecture produced more as metaphor than building.
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Constructed to the designs of local architects Bradshaw, Rowse and Harker, English Heritage said the former Midland is a key example of a postwar bank, unusually employing a high-quality Modernist design - a form of late 1960s pop architecture, which brought "fun and diversity" to the street.
Advantages of the PoP architecture are such that one-step reflow can be used in the concurrent processing of both the top and bottom BGAs.
Typically, most PoP architectures that integrate underfill will underfill only the bottom package.
Accordingly, in Theory and Design in the First Machine Age (1960), Banham imagined a Pop architecture as a radical updating of modern design under the changed conditions of a "Second Machine Age" in which "imageability" became the primary criterion.
Frank gehry is the master of pop architecture whose witty shapes and sinuous lines made in titanium are now considered the epitome of postmodern design.
Multimegabit access concentrators also make it easier for service providers to deploy a distributed, hierarchical POP architecture where traffic is aggregated in small remote POPs and large regional POPs while reducing switching and backhaul needs and, when installed in a multi-tenant building, access concentrators make it possible to add new customers or change bandwidth allocation remotely, eliminating on-site service calls.
The cast of characters will sweep across national boundaries, offering, for example, glimpses of Spain (Equipo Cronica), Italy (Pistoletto), France (Alain Jacquet), Germany (Richter), and England (Paolozzi); the borders of different media will be crossed as well, with nods to Pop architecture (Archigram, Robert Venturi, Disneyland), film and performance pieces (Burckhardt, Kaprow, Gianfranco Baruchello), furniture (Arman, Allen Jones), even rock music.