Poppaea Sabina

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Poppaea Sabina

(pŏpē`ə səbī`nə), d. A.D. 65, Roman empress, wife of NeroNero
(Nero Claudius Caesar) , A.D. 37–A.D. 68, Roman emperor (A.D. 54–A.D. 68). He was originally named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus and was the son of Cnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus (consul in A.D.
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. While married to OthoOtho, Marcus Salvius
, A.D. 32–A.D. 69, Roman emperor (Jan.–April, A.D. 69). He was a friend of Nero, and his wife, Poppaea Sabina, became Nero's mistress; Otho was repaid (A.D. 58) with the province of Lusitania. In A.D.
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, her second husband, she became mistress of Nero, whom she finally married in A.D. 62. She had great influence over Nero, inducing him to have his mother (Agrippina the YoungerAgrippina the Younger,
d. A.D. 59, Roman matron; daughter of Germanicus Caesar and Agrippina the Elder. By her first husband, Cneius Domitius Ahenobarbus, she was the mother of Nero.
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), his former wife (OctaviaOctavia
. 1 d. 11 B.C., Roman matron, sister of Emperor Augustus and wife of Marc Antony, her second husband. For some years, she helped maintain peace between her brother and her husband.
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), and the philosopher SenecaSeneca,
the younger (Lucius Annaeus Seneca) , c.3 B.C.–A.D. 65, Roman philosopher, dramatist, and statesman, b. Corduba (present-day Córdoba), Spain. He was the son of Seneca the elder.
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 killed. One story has it that in a fit of temper Nero kicked her to death.
References in periodicals archive ?
He has music directed Cavalli's L'Ormindo, The Threepenny Opera, UWM's inaugural music theater production of West Side Story and The Coronation of Poppea, and Oklahoma
L'Incoronazione di Poppea, Birminmgham Conservatoire, Crescent Theatre, Birmingham (Mar 6-8).
BBC2 gave us Rugby Special and there was also the opera L'Incoronazione Di Poppea.
ON DECEMBER 16, 2006, THE FINAL DAY of performances of the Los Angeles Opera production of Monteverdi's L'incoronazione di Poppea, the world renowned mezzo soprano, Frederica von Stade graciously took time from her busy schedule for the following interview.
Should not Poppea really feature prominently in a book about Monteverdi's "unruly women"?
The combination of early seventeenth-century Italian poetry and music has bequeathed us heady results, explicitly describing the torments of unrequited love and the lustful delights of consummation, and it is Monteverdi's L'Incoronazione di Poppea, one of the first operas ever written for a paying public, that most exemplifies these emotions.
Of course, much of the cumulative effect depends on the musico-dramatic matter at hand; and I'd rate this year's Niobe midway between the festival's 2007 Lully Psyche (a masterwork brilliantly rendered by Blin) and 2009's L'Incoronazione di Poppea (an even greater masterwork but, in a theatre less congenial than the festival's usual Cutler Majestic, not one of Blin s better stagings).
The decision to focus on Ottavia rather than Poppea in Monteverdi's opera (the only instance in which Heller does not focus on the title role) is significant, as is the mixture of genres introduced by the pastoral La Calisto.
Amoral to its core, Monteverdi's L'Incoronazione Di Poppea sees seduction and betrayal triumph as the eponymous heroine gets both her man and the throne, while her despotic lover Nero annihilates or banishes the opposition.
The world of opera opened up to Ralls through an Academy production of Monteverdi's L'incoronazione di Poppea.
Building on McClary's work on seventeenth-century narrative, Scott analyzes "Pur ti miro" from Monteverdi's L'incoronazione di Poppea (1642) as a representation of the mutual arousal thought necessary for sexual reproduction in the seventeenth century, to the stereotypes dominating American erotic songs of the 1920s and 1930s in what he refers to as the "predator," Mae West, the "innocent," Helen Kane, and the "prim and proper" Ann Suter (pp.
Monteverdi's L'incoronazione di Poppea was delivered with panache and an abundance of delightful satire by a double cast from the Opera Studio of the Vancouver Academy of Music (seen June 12), under the artistic direction of David Meek.