Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola


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Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola

 

(Movimento Popular de Libertaçāo de Angola, MPLA), a revolutionary democratic political party that has led the national liberation struggle of the people of Angola against Portuguese colonial rule. Founded in 1956 on the basis of Marxist groups and progressive organizations, the MPLA brings together peasants, workers, the progressive intelligentsia, and a part of the clergy. The party’s program, adopted in February 1960, advocates the complete abolishment of colonialism and the building of an independent and democratic Angola. According to its rules, the party is structured on the territorial principle and is founded on the principle of democratic centralism.

The MPLA directs various trade union, youth, and women’s organizations set up on its initiative. It maintains friendly relations with the CPSU and is recognized by the Organization of African Unity. The MPLA is officially represented in several African and European countries. Its press organ is the newspaper Vitória ou Morte.

P. I. MANCHKHA

References in periodicals archive ?
Former president Jose Eduardo dos Santos remains head of the the ruling Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) party, giving the veteran leader influence over key policy decisions.
It is widely held that Joao Lourenco, Defence Minister for the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), will take his place.
The main protagonists in this struggle were the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), the National Front for the Liberation of Angola (FNLA), and National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA).
In Angola, the independence movement was led by three movements: the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) led by Agostinho Neto; the National Liberation Front of Angola (FNLA) led by Holden Roberto and the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), led by Jonas Savimbi.
Current Angolan President Dos Santos, in office since 1979, was supported by the Soviet Union as an influential member of Angola's Marxist-Leninist liberation movement, the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola, and lived in exile in the USSR, receiving his university degree in petroleum engineering from Baku, Azerbaijan in 1969.
Between 1975 and 1991 some 425,000 Cubans fought in Angola, newly independent of Portugal, on the side of the government led by the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) against Western-backed forces that included, at various times, apartheid South Africa, Zaire (Congo) under the dictator Mobutu Sese Seko, and the domestic National Movement for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA).
vote, whilst the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) has won convincingly winning 73% of the vote.
In these circumstances around 1970, the national liberation movements of Portuguese colonies more actively engaged in the Committee's sessions were: the National Front for the Liberation of Angola (FNLA), the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC), and the Mozambique Liberation Front (FRELIMO) (3).
With the death of Agostinho Neto, poet, intellectual and man of letters and the first president of the Republic of Angola, Jose Eduardo dos Santos was elected president of the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) on Sept.
Then, President Jose Eduardo dos Santos of the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) garnered 49 percent in the first round elections, but the opposition candidate alleged fraud and returned to war until he was killed in combat ten years later.
The commission's announcement came as European Union observers said on Monday the elections held on September 5, in which Angola's ruling Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) has taken an insurmountable lead, were "transparent".
Following the 1974 collapse of Portuguese rule in Angola, Agostinho Neto's left-wing Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) emerged as the likely successors, prompting covert U.

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