Population viability

Population viability

The ability of a population to persist and to avoid extinction. The viability of a population will increase or decrease in response to changes in the rates of birth, death, and growth of individuals. In natural populations, these rates are not stable, but undergo fluctuations due to external forces such as hurricanes and introduced species, and internal forces such as competition and genetic composition. Such factors can drive populations to extinction if they are severe or if several detrimental events occur before the population can recover. See Ecology, Population ecology

One of the most important uses of population viability models comes from modern conservation biology, which uses these models to determine whether a population is in danger of extinction. This is called population viability analysis (PVA) and consists of demographic and genetic models that are used to make decisions on how to manage populations of threatened or endangered species. The National Research Council has called population viability analysis “the cornerstone, the obligatory tool by which recovery objectives and criteria [for endangered species] are identified.” See Ecological modeling

References in periodicals archive ?
So, even though species adapt to climate change, the pace of such responses is not fast enough to guarantee population viability.
"The demographic knowledge of species index provides significant information that, in conjunction with genetic data, allows estimations of events that affect population viability. Severe population declines, sometimes called genetic bottlenecks, influence the sustainability of populations, as we have found in studying endangered rhinos," said Oliver Ryder, Ph.D., Director of Genetics, San Diego Zoo Global.
In this study we collected three years of observation data, in order to estimate 1) density, 2) structure and 3) reproductive parameters of this population, aiming to 4) infer about its long-term viability by means of a Population Viability Analysis (PVA).
"Since sperm function is essential for reproduction and population viability, these findings could provide one explanation for why biodiversity is suffering under climate change.
10:30 - A POPULATION VIABILITY ANALYSIS OF GREEN ASH TREES WITH EMERALD ASH BORER IMPACTS.
Population viability analysis (PVA) can be used to adequately answer this question and to provide evidence on the likely positive or negative effects of alternative management techniques on roan antelope at RNP.
Integrating epidemiology into population viability analysis: managing the risk posed by rabies and canine distemper to the Ethiopian wolf.
This information was later used in a population viability analysis, which suggested that while the crossing structure improved the viability of the Mountain Pygmy Possum, the negative effect of the road may have been only partially mitigated (van der Ree et al.
The related concept of population viability analysis (PVA) became a more common tool internationally for estimating viability, and it complemented MVP size in Norwegian viability estimates of wolves in the 2000s.
The state contracted with a young researcher from abroad to conduct a wolf population viability analysis, which predicts the likelihood of extinction.
Considering we observed signs of logging at the study site, the extraction of this species, although sustainably managed in some cases, must be avoided especially in small forest fragments, due to the high impact on the population viability. This reaffirms the relevance of demographic studies in different forest remnants, so that it is possible to establish an adequate management of this important ecological and economic resource.
Full browser ?