Population viability

Population viability

The ability of a population to persist and to avoid extinction. The viability of a population will increase or decrease in response to changes in the rates of birth, death, and growth of individuals. In natural populations, these rates are not stable, but undergo fluctuations due to external forces such as hurricanes and introduced species, and internal forces such as competition and genetic composition. Such factors can drive populations to extinction if they are severe or if several detrimental events occur before the population can recover. See Ecology, Population ecology

One of the most important uses of population viability models comes from modern conservation biology, which uses these models to determine whether a population is in danger of extinction. This is called population viability analysis (PVA) and consists of demographic and genetic models that are used to make decisions on how to manage populations of threatened or endangered species. The National Research Council has called population viability analysis “the cornerstone, the obligatory tool by which recovery objectives and criteria [for endangered species] are identified.” See Ecological modeling

References in periodicals archive ?
Integrating epidemiology into population viability analysis: managing the risk posed by rabies and canine distemper to the Ethiopian wolf.
Contract Awarded for Notice of Intent to Sole Source Research Regarding Population Viability of the Wood Thrush Within and Surrounding DoD Installations
This information was later used in a population viability analysis, which suggested that while the crossing structure improved the viability of the Mountain Pygmy Possum, the negative effect of the road may have been only partially mitigated (van der Ree et al.
The state contracted with a young researcher from abroad to conduct a wolf population viability analysis, which predicts the likelihood of extinction.
Considering we observed signs of logging at the study site, the extraction of this species, although sustainably managed in some cases, must be avoided especially in small forest fragments, due to the high impact on the population viability.
A habitat-based population viability analysis for ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in the United States.
Genetic analysis can address many conservation issues including population viability analysis (Menges, 2000), historical relationships between subpopulations (O'Brien, 1994), and the setting of conservation priorities based on biogeographic data and species delineation (Hugall et al.
In the practice of wildlife conservation, to date most attention has focused on the threat EIDs pose to biodiversity and wildlife population viability.
This second issue is dedicated exclusively to Cook Inlet studies and includes a review of spatio-temporal changes in beluga distribution, a population viability analysis and extinction risk assessment, a summary of potential natural and anthropogenic risks, a calf index, a citizen science project, a note on socio-sexual behavior, and beluga behavioral responses observed during Port of Anchorage monitoring studies.
This, the third edition, contains new chapters covering habitat use and fragmentation, wildlife movement and corridors, evolutionary responses to disturbance, population viability analysis, and climate change.
Our study, which is the result of ten years' of research, seriously questions previously held assumptions about the factors affecting population viability in large predators threatened by extinction.
Because of the decline in many local populations, we studied the population viability of ptarmigan in one core population with the goal to enhance conservation of ptarmigan in Japan.
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