porbeagle

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porbeagle:

see makomako
, heavy-bodied, fast-swimming shark, genus Isurus, highly prized as a game fish. Also known as the sharp-nosed mackerel shark, it is a member of the mackerel shark family, which also includes the white shark and the porbeagle.
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porbeagle

any of several voracious sharks of the genus Lamna, esp L. nasus, of northern seas: family Isuridae
References in periodicals archive ?
Last week a shore fisherman caught a 7ft long porbeagle, a relative of the great white shark, just yards away from a holiday beach in Pembrokeshire.
The porbeagle is a common find in UK waters but still caused quite a stir.
The porbeagle shark, which eats mainly mackerel and herring, is relatively rare in British waters.
Porbeagle sharks, which passed by a vote of 86 for, 42 against and 8abstentions.
The 7ft porbeagle shark was brought ashore and is now catching the attention of shoppers at the North Shields Fish Quay after it was snapped up by Seaview Fisheries.
Shark experts yesterday said it was the first known attack by a porbeagle in Scottish waters.
In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, the length at maturity of male and female porbeagles has been well determined (Jensen et al.
When they mixed these six primers and tissue from each of 33 different shark species, the researchers unambiguously identified the target species: longfin mako, shortfin mako, porbeagle, dusky, silky, and blue sharks.
Along with blue sharks, porbeagles - Lamna nasus in Latin - are the most common species of shark in UK waters.
Our spectacular, delicious and fairly numerous porbeagle, readily distinguished by a distinctive white patch at the base of its dorsal fin, locally garnishes as much respect and recognition as a low-to-the-ground hound dog.
Porbeagles can grow to 12ft in length and have a life expectancy of 30 to 40 years.
The 8ft porbeagle was landed about 10 miles off Tynemouth - far from its more usual haunts on the south coast of England.