Porous paving

Porous paving

A paving material that allows rainfall to percolate through and infiltrate the ground, rather than contributing to stormwater runoff; can be asphalt, concrete, or grid paver.
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The company recreated and revolutionized the porous paving industry with the introduction of the original KBI Flexi-Pave.
We need to look at: Porous paving: Instead of tarmac, use paving or bricks with gaps between, or a grass strip up the centre of the driveway.
EnduraGrid is an interlocking porous paving system for construction site parking areas or access routes, accommodating up to 45-ton vehicles.
Green innovations like porous paving for streets and sidewalks, combined with 36,000 square feet of rain gardens aim to capture and retain 95% of stormwater that falls within the downtown district, relieving the burden on the municipal storm sewer system and detaining urban pollutants from reaching streams and other waterways.
Awarded LEED Platinum, the project's features include a 7,000-square-foot green roof and porous paving, operable windows, high-efficiency lighting and plumbing, low-VOC and recycled materials, and reflective exterior materials that reduce heat-island effect.
Installation of all porous paving is straightforward and can be done by relative novices.
* porous paving in the rear parking lot and on the side of the building to reduce storm water runoff;
Twenty-five papers from a November 2005 conference held in Paris present an adaptive decision support system (ADSS) for controlling urban stormwater pollution using such techniques as swales, soakaways, constructed wetlands, ponds, and porous paving. The first two parts of the volume introduce the graphical user interface called Hydropolis, describe its management functions and modeling tools, and tour its databases containing stakeholder classifications, policy instruments, and case studies.
Turf Cells, a form of porous paving that houses and reinforces turf grass so that you can drive on it, allowed the homeowners to keep the functionality of their driveway yet visually connect it with the garden.
The geothermal cooling system (see "Green Perks," page 138) is perhaps the most significant, but the homes also include many other water- and energy-saving features, such as courtyards lined with porous paving stones and landscaping with indigenous and drought-tolerant plants.