Porsena

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Porsena

 

(Porsenna), an Etruscan ruler of the city of Clusium in the sixth century B.C.

According to legend, Porsena led a war against Rome in 508–507 B.C. in order to restore to power the Etruscan Tarquinian dynasty that had been expelled from Rome at the end of the sixth century B.C. Roman tradition surrounding the war extols the heroism of the defenders of Rome, which allegedly compelled Porsena to lift the siege and conclude a peace on terms honorable to Rome. According to another, more reliable, version preserved by the Roman historian Tacitus in his History (III, 72, 1), Porsena took Rome.

References in periodicals archive ?
Next to Brutus stands Gaius Mucius Scaevola, the legendary young Roman who in 507 BC attempted to save Rome, which was under siege by the Etruscan King Porsenna. He penetrated the enemy camp and mistakenly killed a scribe instead of Porsenna.
Although he never set foot outside Britain, he liked nothing better than to indulge his penchant for drafting reconstructions of famous structures, particularly the Tomb of Porsenna, of which he made 28 drawings.
Pliny, who recalls this report, adds that an Etruscan king, Lars Porsenna, had his own labyrinthine necropolis created in imitation of the Egyptian at Clusium.
It was Horatius' nephew, another devoted patriot, who saved Rome the following year by holding the bridge against the Etruscan host of Lars Porsenna and his ally, the banished Tarquin.