Portuguese man-of-war


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Related to Portuguese man-of-war: fin whale, Physalia physalis

Portuguese man-of-war:

see jellyfishjellyfish,
common name for the free-swimming stage (see polyp and medusa), of certain invertebrate animals of the phylum Cnidaria (the coelenterates). The body of a jellyfish is shaped like a bell or umbrella, with a clear, jellylike material filling most of the space between
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; polyp and medusapolyp and medusa,
names for the two body forms, one nonmotile and one typically free swimming, found in the aquatic invertebrate phylum Cnidaria (the coelenterates). Some animals of this group are always polyps, some are always medusae, and some exhibit both a polyp and a medusa
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.

Portuguese man-of-war

[‚pȯr·chə′gēz ¦man əv ′wȯr]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of several brilliantly colored tropical siphonophores in the genus Physalia which possess a large float and extremely long tentacles.

Portuguese man-of-war

a long tentacled jellyfish whose sting can be deadly. [Zoology: NCE, 1408]

Portuguese man-of-war

any of several large complex colonial hydrozoans of the genus Physalia, esp P. physalis, having an aerial float and long stinging tentacles: order Siphonophora
References in periodicals archive ?
We've received several confirmed reports of Portuguese Man-of-War stranded on beaches around Cornwall and the Scilly Isles.
There are a few cases on record where Portuguese man-of-war stings on humans have resulted in fatalities, and victims can suffer intense fever and anaphylactic shock.
Anyone who thinks they have found a Portuguese Man-Of-War should avoid contact and telephone Steve Moon on 01656 643170.
Dr John Gee, a zoologist with the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, warned bathers the potentially dangerous Portuguese man-of-war jellyfish, are common in warmer seas.
There's the blue-ringed octopus, the piranha, the black torpedo ray and the Portuguese man-of-war.
As a child, I was once stung by a huge Portuguese man-of-war and to this day I can still remember the agony.
The most dangerous jellyfish-type species to be seen in British waters is the potentially lethal Portuguese man-of-war.
Depending on what has stung you, you could have the following symptoms too: Jellyfish and Portuguese man-of-war often leave raised blisters that are in the shape of their own tentacles.
Bathers are being warned that they may come across the Portuguese man-of-war, which delivers a painful sting that can be deadly without urgent medical attention