Possibilists

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Possibilists

 

an opportunistic trend in the French workers’ movement from the 1880’s to the early 20th century that supported the idea of municipal socialism. At first the Possibilists, headed by P. Brousse and soon after by B. Malon, who later left the Possibilist group, constituted the reformist petit bourgeois wing of the Workers’ Party (Parti Ouvrier, founded 1879). They led the struggle against revolutionary Marxism and adhered to the “policy of possibilities” as formulated by Brousse (hence their name).

In 1882 the Possibilists succeeded in splitting the Workers’ Party between their own faction and the Guesdists. They then began to call themselves the Workers’ Party of Socialist Revolutionaries, and in 1883 they assumed the name of Federation of French Workers-Socialists. In the 1880’s the Possibilists attempted to gain leadership of the international workers’ movement, but most socialist organizations did not support them. As a result of this struggle, two parallel congresses were held in Paris in 1889: the International Socialist Congress of Marxists, which founded the Second International, and the Congress of Possibilists, who found themselves isolated. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Possibilists joined the French Socialist Party.

References in periodicals archive ?
The second perspective, architectural possibilism, assumes that a predetermined experience is unlikely and that all physical features have an equal chance of attracting user interest and affecting the user experience.
5) At the other end of the spectrum is a kind of geographical possibilism, or voluntarism, that insists that place has no effect upon the spirit--at least, not upon the spirit strong enough to resist it.
In Chile, for another example, besides orthodox finance, possibilism emphasises spending to improve education.
Two modifications of this perspective, environmentalism possibilism and environmental probabilism, allow culture to play a role.
Returning to the debate between actualism and possibilism, it is clear that the actualist must reject this conclusion.
The dispute between them is reminiscent of, but clearer than, the more familiar one between possibilism and actualism.
Betty Meggers, staunch supporter of the 'standard model', has reconstituted Amazonian cultural history on a blend of monocausal environmental possibilism and diffusionism since the 1950s, modifying some perspectives along the way.