parietal lobe

(redirected from Posterior parietal)
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parietal lobe

[pə′rī·əd·əl ‚lōb]
(anatomy)
The cerebral lobe of the brain above the lateral cerebral sulcus and behind the central sulcus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dorsal stream dysfunction results from posterior parietal damage and is often associated with cerebral palsy, birth trauma, premature birth, hydrocephalus and Williams syndrome.
Caption: Figure 2: DW/ADC map series showing patchy diffusion restriction in posterior parietal sections as well as splenial segment of corpus callosum.
Similar properties are shown by neurons in the posterior parietal cortex [6, 20].
* Posterior Parietal Artery (PPA): Emerging from the posterior end of the Sylvian fissure and extends first posteriorly and then anteriorly along the posterior of the parietal lobe.
The regions with decreased activation were in anterior cingulate, middle and superior temporal, superior frontal, and posterior parietal; in addition, these regions might reflect learning related behavioral performance.[sup][28] Besides, deactivation in the central executive network and default mode network were reported in former studies which might reflect working memory and cognitive and emotion control.[sup][51],[52] Some of the studies selected in the meta-analysis had not found decreased activation, observed but had not reported, or had not examined deactivation regions, therefore, when three studies that reported decreased activation after CRT were conducted by ALE, there was no significant region identified.
On the detailed brain scans, the researchers found that the women with depression or bipolar disorder had different levels of activity than healthy women in the brain's right posterior parietal cortex.
It was clear that certain neurons in the posterior parietal cortex are responsible for the planning of arm movements.
The visual system is divided into a ventral pathway, extending from the inferior temporal cortex to the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), responsible for object identification, and a dorsal stream, extending from posterior parietal cortex (PPC) to dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), responsible for spatial location of objects [29].
When children had drawn a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three areas of the brain that are activated in adults when they read and write: the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex.
Results demonstrated strong convergence in brain regions commonly associated with the working memory construct (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, fusiform gyri, and posterior parietal cortex).
Cohen Kadosh found that when he attached an anode to the area of the brain known as the left posterior parietal cortex and a cathode to the right side of the same region and applied the mild current, learning skills improved, while reversing the electrical conductors, the treatment didn't work.

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