posthole

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posthole

[′pōst‚hōl]
(civil engineering)
A hole bored in the ground to hold a fence post.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The excavation uncovered three substructures within the final Late Classic mound, as well as three postholes in the bedrock at the base of the trench.
Regardless if your next project involves fencing, adding a deck or shed, or even planting some trees, take the time to research some of the options available to help you get your postholes completed as efficiently as possible--and with the least amount of time and labor.
In an archaeological context for example, punctual anomalies can be associated with fires, filled holes and postholes, and linear anomalies can be associated walls or ditches (Fassbinder 2015).
In the southwestern part of the terrace, there is a curvilinear line of five postholes averaging approximately 15 cm in diameter.
Although no unique features were identified at Vainu'u, features not present at Vainu'u were identified at Aganoa and To'aga in association with pottery: an ili'ili surface and shell midden were identified at Aganoa; while shell middens, pits and postholes associated with possible residential structures were identified at To'aga.
(6,18) During posthole preparation, the intraradicular smear layer formed was thicker than those observed in coronal cavities.
I have identified three ways to dig poetic postholes in the social studies curriculum, which I introduce next with examples that invite students to relate with history more intimately.
Statistical analysis here impressively extracts four repeatedly used house sites from a forest of postholes. Much of the value of the site lies in the combination of a virtually complete settlement plan with the preservation and stratification of a large and rich assemblage of artefacts and food remains in the surrounding reedswamp deposits which accumulated in the course of 200-300 years of occupation.
Investigation of sites elsewhere in the locality suggest that, if archaeological remains are present, they will consist of pits, gullies, boundary ditches, and postholes cut into the natural sandstone, which is known to lies just beneath the modern ground surface.
Postholes and slots in the floors once anchored wooden furniture.
Postholes can be excavated using clamshell diggers, augers, and powered augers.