postpartum depression


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Related to postpartum depression: postpartum psychosis

postpartum depression

[‚pōs¦pärd·əm di′presh·ən]
(psychology)
Any acute depression occurring within approximately 3 months following childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
This new discovery opens doors to potential new treatments and drugs for postpartum depression targeting oxytocin receptor cells.
Zulresso, the first medicine specifically approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of postpartum depression in adults, is a positive allosteric modulator of both synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.
Until now, there have been no drugs specifically approved to treat postpartum depression. Commonly, postpartum depression is treated with medications that previously were approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder, despite limited evidence documenting their efficacy for postpartum depression.
THE APPROVAL OF BREXANOLONE by the FDA for postpartum depression is a major accomplishment for the field of reproductive psychiatry.
Bethany Monte, a midwife at Saint Vincent's, said it was vital for all families to watch out for the symptoms of postpartum depression and seek help.
Both postpartum blues (PPB) and then the more significant postpartum depression (PPD) occur within the first days to 12 months postpartum.
The goal of House Bill 2466 is to get low-income mothers screened for postpartum depression early - during their baby's initial doctor visits.
Postpartum depression (PPD) is a disorder of multifactorial origin with significant consequences on both maternal and child health.
North American and European research on postpartum depression estimates a 10-15% rate for the condition (O'Hara, 1987; O'Hara, 1990; Pitt, 1968; Seyfried and Marcus 2003), while studies on the 'baby blues' indicate a rate of 30-85% (Pitt, 1968; O'Hara, 1987; Seyfried and Marcus 2003; Pearlstein, Howard, Salisbury, and Zlotnick, 2009).
I want to thank Emily Dagostino for sharing her experience of what is becoming increasingly known and recognized: postpartum depression ("Sunshine and shadows," October).
New research reveals that telephone-based peer support may help reduce postnatal depression, also known as postpartum depression, in new mothers.