Potato Famine


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Potato Famine

estimated 200,000 Irish died (1846). [Irish Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 705]
See: Hunger
References in periodicals archive ?
New York student Benjamin 'Benjy' Firester has won one of the United States' top young science prizes for his research on the devastating microorganism which caused the Irish Potato Famine, devising a computer model that could prevent it causing billions of dollars in lost crops every year.
At the height of the Irish potato famine of the 1840s, for instance, life expectancy dropped to 18.
Lack of genetic variability caused the infamous Irish Potato Famine from 1845 to 1852 where the population of potatoes, a primary constituent of the Irish diet, was infected by a disease called Phytophthora infestans.
Victoria ITV, 9pm DRAMA The Irish Potato Famine isn't the sexiest of topics for a Sunday night drama, but the reality of the horror across the sea is reaching the Palace and Victoria believes her government must act.
Bray recounts how confiscation of Irish land by officers and agents of Tudor monarchs led to the mass emigration of Irish people, beginning the early 18th century but opening to a flood when the potato famine of the middle 19th century made the little land left to the Irish infertile.
Among those taking part in the Liverpool protest was Vicki Worthington, who said St Luke's had been chosen because it has a memorial to those who suffered in the Irish potato famine.
Orphaned Irish siblings Molly and Kip, fleeing the potato famine, arrive at Windsor estate to work as servants at the creepy, crumbling English manor house that is entwined with a massive, sinister tree.
That disease has plagued farmers for generations and triggered the Irish potato famine in the 1840s, the BBC reported.
of Limerick, Ireland) presents a very short history of the key events, but also social contexts of the great potato famine that struck Ireland in the mid 19th century.
It offers an extensive range of potatoes and keeps at the forefront of consumer trends by regularly introducing new varieties--most recently the Irish Lumper Potato which has not been commercially cultivated since the potato famine of the 1840s.
A team of molecular biologists has determined that a unique strain of potato blight caused the Irish potato famine, which killed around a million people during the mid-19th century.
Set in 1833 Ireland, before the potato famine, Brian Friel's Translations is about young Owen who works translating Irish place names into words the English will understand for their new maps of the country.