Potidaea

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Potidaea

(pŏtĭdē`ə), ancient city, NE Greece, at the narrowest point of the Pallene (now Kassándra) peninsula in Chalcidice (now Khalkidhikí). It was a Corinthian colony (c.600 B.C.) but joined the Athenian-dominated Delian League. Potidaea revolted (432) against Athens with Corinthian help, providing one of the incitements to the Peloponnesian WarPeloponnesian War
, 431–404 B.C., decisive struggle in ancient Greece between Athens and Sparta. It ruined Athens, at least for a time. The rivalry between Athens' maritime domain and Sparta's land empire was of long standing. Athens under Pericles (from 445 B.C.
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. Athens recaptured (430 or 429) the city. Philip IIPhilip II,
382–336 B.C., king of Macedon (359–336 B.C.), son of Amyntas II. While a hostage in Thebes (367–364), he gained much knowledge of Greece and its people.
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 of Macedon took (356) Potidaea and may have destroyed it in the ensuing war. Rebuilt by Cassander, the city was named Cassandreia.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Potidaea

 

(Poteidaia or Potidaia), an ancient Greek city on the Pallini (Kassandra) Peninsula of Chalcidice. Founded circa 600 B.C. by the Corinthians, Potidaea became a member of the Delian League. However, because of an increase in the phoros (the annual levy required from league members) and interference by Athens in the city’s domestic affairs, Potidaea seceded from the league in 432 B.C. This action was one of the causes of the Peloponnesian War of 431–404 B.C.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grayling observes in DESCARTES: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF A GENIUS (Walker, $26.95), Wittgenstein soldiered on the eastern front in the First World War, Socrates was a hoplite in the Athenian army at Potidea, Spinoza's family fled religious persecution, John Locke fled James II, Bertrand Russell went to jail for pacifism, and Martin Heidegger was a Nazi.
This is how Thucydides nails down the beginning of the Peloponnesian War: "In the 15th year [of a truce in the war], in the 48th year of the priesthood of Chrysis of Argos, when Enesias was ephor at Sparta and Pythodorus still had two months to serve as archon at Athens, six months after the battle of Potidea, just at the beginning of spring...."