Poto-Poto


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Poto-Poto

 

an art school for contemporary African painting and drawing; it is named after one of the districts of Brazzaville.

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On Wednesday 5th October, the Minister for Information, Press and Radio, Eugenio Nze Obiang, presented office materials to the directors of the newspaper Poto-Poto, in Bata.
Paulo Kapela (n.1947, Uige) e um artista autodidata que, na decada de 1960 frequentou a Escola de pintura Poto-Poto em Brazzaville na Republica Democratica do Congo sendo que atualmente vive e trabalha em Luanda.
Referencia para alguns jovens artistas angolanos, a obra de Kapela e dificil de classificar, destacando-se pela criacao de instalacoes que integram uma miriade de materiais dispares como pinturas (que seguem uma linguagem da escola de Poto-Poto) imagens publicitarias, simbolos religiosos, objetos do quotidiano, textos, desenhos, fotografia, slogans de propaganda politica que, no seu conjunto remetem, primeiramente, para a precariedade da vivencia quotidiana do individuo/artista e incorporam as dimensoes estetica/vivencial/ontologica fundindo arte e vida.
Though artists suffered during a Marxist-Leninist period of post-colonial rule, Congo has again become home to a robust artistic community, thanks in large part to the acclaimed Poto-Poto School of painting.
The bright colors of tropical flowers and wildlife, from turquoise to tangerine, that distinguish the Poto-Poto School, also show up in the costumes of Brazzaville's renowned dandies known as sapeurs.
This provocative way of borrowing from other poets, or at least from poetry in general, in any case from that in which he recognizes his own, is a way that punctuates in other respects to better mark down his choice, the accents, the cries, the onomatopoeias that he collected in what he calls his "prodigious ascendance,": rooh on ..., hele helele ..., likouala likouala ..., poto-poto ...
In 1951, in a district of Brazzaville, French painter Pierre Lods created a center for African art in the image of Romain-Desfosses's "hanger," which would be known by the name of Ecole de Poto-Poto.
I brought everyone back to my case-atelier in Poto-Poto. It was thus a wealth of talents, a squandering of ideas, an astounding blossoming of inspiration, a paradise of colors, of joy, and of song.
For example, the Ecole de Poto-Poto, created on the initiative of Pierre Lods, must have had to resort to funding from the colonial administrative authorities of the time.
One of the city's special features was the concentration of its indigenous inhabitants into two widely separated villages, Poto-Poto and Bacongo.
In a fascinating chapter Martin sets out some of the consequences-the large number of teams and perceived social importance of lay versus Christian, and Poto-Poto versus Bacongo matches, the invocation of talismans and other magical practices to secure success, the festive nature of matches with bands and huge crowds, and the clash with the colonial authorities when they tried to prevent the wearing of boots or shoes by African players.