pouch

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pouch

1. Zoology a saclike structure in any of various animals, such as the abdominal receptacle marsupium in marsupials or the cheek fold in rodents
2. Anatomy any sac, pocket, or pouchlike cavity or space in an organ or part
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References in periodicals archive ?
The scan revealed the presence of a cornual anechoic mass with a hyperechoic border, compatible with tubal ring in the interstitial portion of the right tube, with maximum diameter of 0,87 cm, (Figure 4) and no free fluid in the pouch of Douglas. At admission, serum [beta]-hCG level was 3212 UI/L.
Moreover, seeing as her abdominal pain was accompanied by fever, raised inflammatory markers, intermenstrual bleeding, and "complex", free fluid in the pouch of Douglas, a diagnosis of PID was readily made.
There is also a possibility that fertilization may occur in the pouch of Douglas and intraperitoneal fluid flow may carry the zygote to some other intraperitoneal location [22].
Prediction of pouch of Douglas Obliteration in women with suspected endometriosis using a new real time dynamic transvaginal ultrasound technique: the sliding sign.
It affects approximately 10 Percent females and commonly presents in the ovaries, uterosacral ligament, pouch of Douglas and pelvic peritoneum, while, the rare sites of endometriosis include intestine, bladder, surgical scars, umbilicus6, diaphragm7, and groin8.
On review by the gynaecologist, clinical examination revealed a normal lower genital tract and cervix with a 12-14cm right adnexial mass and no involvement of the pouch of douglas. A transabdominal and transvaginal ultrasound scan was requested which revealed a 12 cm complex right ovarian cyst with a 3 cm daughter cyst.
The largest dimension of these lesions is located under the peritoneal fold of the rectouterine pouch of Douglas. The cranial movement of these posterior fornix lesions eventually causes the nodules to join the anterior rectal wall and creates an "hourglass"-like appearance.
Gynecologic examination showed greenish, purulent vaginal discharge and a fluctuant mass in the pouch of Douglas. Uterine cervical motion caused pain to the patient.
There was significant correlation between the site of the tenderness on TVS and that of endometriosis on laparoscopy (right adnexa/ovary, left adnexa/ovary, and pouch of Douglas), with an odds ratio of 1.3.
(1) The Pouch of Douglas (POD) is the most common location of abdominal pregnancy followed by the mesosalpinx and omentum.
Fluid and "sliding sign" were shown in the Pouch of Douglas. At laparoscopy, two voluminous adnexal masses, measuring about 7 cm, with exophytic vegetation and superficial vascularization, were seen bilaterally.