power-law fluid

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power-law fluid

[′pau̇·ər ‚lȯ ‚flü·əd]
(fluid mechanics)
A fluid in which the shear stress at any point is proportional to the rate of shear at that point raised to some power.
References in periodicals archive ?
A theoretical approach to study the calendering of power-law fluids was also shown by Brazinsky et al.
Previous observations are consistent with earlier findings in the context of Newtonian as well as non-Newtonian Power-law fluids (18) which demonstrated negligible Pr dependence of [theta] and [bar.
In 1965, Vaughn [18] extended the approach of slot flow approximation to pursue a solution of non-Newtonian Power-law fluids in eccentric annulus.
The non-Darcy flow characteristics of non-Newtonian power-law fluids past a wedge embedded in a porous medium investigated by Kim [17].
Chukwu, "A Simplified Couette-Flow Solution of Non-Newtonian Power-Law Fluids in Eccentric Annuli," Can.
The dependency of wall shear rate for power-law fluids in closed Couette flow has been shown to be represented by a correction factor [[Alpha].
13), (14), Michaeli (15), and Baird and Collias (16) extensively review concentric axial annular flow of Newtonian and power-law fluids.
and Kostic, M, "Turbulent Friction Factor Correlation For Power-law Fluids in Circular and Non-Circular Channels," INT.
In view of this, therefore it seems reasonable to begin with the analysis of purely viscous power-law fluids as long as the model parameters are evaluated in the shear-rate range relevant to the flow past a cylinder, and such an analysis can, in turn, be used to build up the level of complexity in a gradual fashion to accommodate the other non-Newtonian features including visco-elasticity, time dependence and yield stress, etc.
Tiu, "Characterisation of Inelastic Power-Law Fluids Using Falling Sphere Data," Can.
This study presents analytical solutions for viscous power-law fluids flowing through tapered capillary (truncated cone) and slit (wedge) dies under slip conditions, ranging from no-slip to severe slip.
Closed-form sheeting die design equations have been derived assuming one-dimensional flow of isothermal Newtonian and power-law fluids in the manifold and land regions of a sheeting die [1-5].