PowerPC 601

PowerPC 601

(processor)
A 32-bit RISC processor with 2.8 million transistors (~1.2 million in the core logic) and 32 kilobytes of on-chip cache. Die size: 118.8 mm2. Heat dissipation at 66MHz: 9W. Performance at 66MHz: integer >60 SPECint92, floating-point >80 SPECfp92. Estimated manufacturing cost: $76. Maximum instructions per cycle: 3. 32 32-bit general-purpose registers. 32 64-bit floating-point registers. Successors: PowerPC 603, 604, 620.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1993 entries included Intel's Pentium and the PowerPC 601, a product of IBM and Motorola.
They run on a PowerPC 601 chip, which is less powerful and expensive than the PowerPC 604 chip.
The $1,699 Power 100 base configuration consists of the PowerPC 601 running at 100MHz, 8Mb RAM, a 365Mb Quantum hard drive, 256Kb Level 2 Cache, built-in video support.
Parsytec also recently became the first HPC manufacturer to incorporate Motorola's PowerPC 601 microprocessor into its product line.
With designs completed on schedule for the first two PowerPC family members--the PowerPC 601 and PowerPC 603 microprocessors--the computing industry can expect a steady stream of PowerPC microprocessors satisfying a broad range of market requirements to be introduced in the years to come.
These include the MPC-GX1 desktop A-V personal computer that uses a RISC-based 66Mhz PowerPC 601 CPU, 3-D speakers, a quad speed CD-ROM drive, and bundled Pioneer A-V software.
Processor chips have been available since early 1993, and first PowerPC 601 microprocessor-based systems were introduced by IBM in the fall of 1993.
The 1993 entries include Intel's Pentium and PowerPC 601, the product of IBM and Motorola.
The first PowerPC microprocessor, the PowerPC 601 microprocessor, is now available from both IBM and Motorola.
But the 601 underwent major enhancements to improve performance and reduce costs (see sidebar "A Comparison of PowerPC 601 and PowerPC 603 Features.") For example, a more sophisticated branch unit, enhanced with multiprocessor features including Motorola's 88110 high-performance microprocessor bus interface was included.
Following closely on the heels of its predecessor, the PowerPC 601 microprocessor [1], the 603 microprocessor was developed at the joint Motorola/IBM/Apple Somerset Design Center in Austin, Texas.
The BRAT tool has been used for performance modeling of the PowerPC 601, PowerPC 603, PowerPC 604, and PowerPC 620 microprocessors.