Poynting theorem

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Poynting theorem

[′pȯint·iŋ ‚thir·əm]
(electromagnetism)
A theorem, derived from Maxwell's equations, according to which the rate of loss of energy stored in electric and magnetic fields within a region of space is equal to the sum of the rate of dissipation of electrical energy as heat and the rate of flow of electromagnetic energy outward through the surface of the region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, we use the Poynting's theorem in complex frequency domain [10] to specify the characteristics of the electromagnetic power of natural modes of arbitrary PEC bodies, to our best knowledge, for the first time.
Equation (18) is called the Poynting's theorem in complex frequency domain.
And it is straightforward to show that many electromagnetic theorems, like Poynting's theorem and reciprocity theorem are also preserved.
In addition, discrete Poynting's theorem and reciprocity theorem are also derived.
Poynting's theorem yields an energetic continuity equation as
Combination of Umov theorem [22] and Poynting's theorem [23] yields the definition for instant velocity of transportation of the modal field energy as