Pozzolana


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Pozzolana

 

(also pozzuolana or pozzolan), rocks consisting of loose products of volcanic eruptions (ash, tuffs, pumice). Owing to its hydraulic activity (the absorption of milligrams of CaO from 1 g of lime solution), pozzolana is used as a hydraulic additive in the production of binding materials called pozzolana cements. Similar hydraulic cements are called trasses. Large deposits of pozzolana are located in Italy. In the USSR deposits of pozzolana and trass are found in the Northern Caucasus (city of Nal’chik), in the Crimea (Mount Karadag), and the Armenian SSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sustainable production of blended cement in Pakistan through addition of natural pozzolana.
It is widely used with these physical characteristics as a light-weight construction material, fill material, insulation material, refractor material, cement pozzolana and absorbent material [7-9].
Al-Rajhi Cement Jordan operates a cement manufacturing plant in Al-Mafraq, Jordan, producing gypsum, limestone, white cement and Pozzolana Portland cement.
Cement is a product formed by three principal materials, setting regulator (plaster or anhydrate), additives (limestone, pozzolana and slag) and clinker.
In groups of five, Italians seized by SS officers were lined up and shot, at close range, in the Ardeatine Caves, a disused pozzolana quarry on the southeastern outskirts of Rome335 in total.
4%, has a high water demand as a typical pozzolana and its strength development differs notably from that of 1AEF1: in 7 up to 28 days of hardening, 8AEF1 and 1AEF1 prisms had an analogical strength development.
Furthermore, some pozzolana materials are becoming expensive and unavailable in market (Erdem, Kirca 2008; Cassagnabere et al.
WHILE THE ASSAULT ON THE OVERPASS paused briefly, the Germans continued throwing troops and tanks against another hot spot: the Cava di Pozzolana.
1489-1991 Part-I, "Portland Pozzolana Cement--Specifications," Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi, India, 1991.
During the reign of Napoleon in 1802, the French engineer Charles Berigny used a suspension of water and pozzolana cement to fill up caves in the watery gravel ground of a sluice at Dieppe port damaged by settlements to stabilise deposited alluviums.
Since the Judaic tradition did not permit incineration of a dead body, the Judaic communities in Ancient Rome found a solution for burying--they secretly used former galleries of pozzolana extractions (Oliveira 2007: 30), where the holes were excavated in the walls for the inhumation of dead.