Praguerie


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Praguerie

(prägərē`), 1440, revolt against King Charles VII of France, so called in allusion to the Hussite uprising in Prague. It was led by several great feudal lords, including the comte de Dunois, who resented the diminution of their influence over the royal government. They were joined by the dauphin (later Louis XI) and were supported by Philip the Good of Burgundy. The revolt was quickly suppressed, and the rebels were treated leniently by the king.

Praguerie

 

a revolt of the feudal aristocracy in France, lasting from February to July 1440, directed against the centralizing policy of the crown. It received its name because of supposed similarities with the movement of the Prague Hussites.

The revolt was incited by the Orleans ordinance of Charles VII in 1439, which prohibited the feudal lords from raising mercenary troops and which established a standing royal army. The Praguerie was led by the dukes of Bourbon and Alençon. The rebels, who were based in Poitou, Auvergne, and Bourbon, wanted to remove Charles VII from power, make a nominal ruler of the 16-year-old dauphin (the future Louis XI), and rule in the dauphin’s name. The Praguerie was crushed by the king with the aid of the cities.

References in classic literature ?
Here opens the stormy period of the Jacqueries, Pragueries, and Leagues.